Reward grows for information about killers of Chilean man

Adolfo Ignacio Celedon. Photo courtesy of the Celedon family

The reward for information leading to the capture and conviction of the men who killed Adolfo Ignacio Celedón has increased to $20,000, thanks to a new donation made by the Chilean government.

Celedón was killed 10 months ago on Sept. 12, 2010, at the intersection of Adeline and Emerson streets. He and his fiancé, Amber Nelson, were walking home around 3:41 a.m. from a concert at Ashkenz when two black males jumped out of a black SUV and attempted to rob them. Celedón was shot and killed as he tried to protect Nelson. It was Celedón’s 35th birthday.

“The tragic death of Adolfo Celedón … is a high priority and sensitive matter of concern to the Chilean Government,” said Consul General of Chile Rolando F. Ortega, according to a press release put out by the Berkeley Police Department. “The Consulate General of Chile and the Chilean Ministry of Foreign Affairs support an expeditious investigation and prompt resolution to this case.”

Celedón had moved from Chile to Berkeley to be with his fiance Nelson, a student studying for a master’s degree in architecture at UC Berkeley.


The case has been closely followed by the Chilean media, according to Berkeley police.

“His friends and family in Chile are praying to have his murder case solved in the near future and we think justice will be done so we can have some peace in our hearts,” said Celedón’s sister, Alejandra Celedón. “We will not give up on our efforts and it is our intention to resolve this very unfortunate, senseless death…”

The Berkeley Police Department asks anyone with information about this crime to call the Investigations Division, Homicide Detail, at 510-981-5741, or the 24-hour non-emergency number, 510-981-5900. Community members can call the Bay Area Crimes Stoppers (BACS) at 800-222-TIPS (8477) to remain anonymous. Calls to BACS are completely confidential.

Said police, any information may be critical to solving this crime. Sometimes the smallest or seemingly insignificant detail can be the key to arresting the suspect or suspects in any crime.