2 arrested after shootings on Sacramento Street

Berkeley police investigate a Sacramento Street shooting on Dec. 23, 2011. Photo: Frances Dinkelspiel

Update, 01.25.12: New information received from Assistant District Attorney Teresa Drenick from the Alameda County District Attorney’s office clarifies that Tyler Frank Jamison is in fact 16 but that he was filed on as an adult.

Two 18-year-old Berkeley men have been arrested in connection with the shooting of two teenagers on Sacramento Street on Dec. 23.

Tyler Frank Jamison, 18 16, who lives on Hearst Avenue, has  been charged with two counts of attempted murder, assault with a firearm, and other charges, and is being held without bail in Santa Rita Jail, according to Teresa Drenick, an assistant district attorney in the Alameda County District Attorney’s office.

Tyrone Anthony Terell, 18, was charged with a weapons violation, according to a press release issued by Berkeley police.

The two men were arrested on Jan. 13 when a patrol officer recognized the suspects, whose name and photos had been distributed in an internal wanted photo, according to the BPD press release.

Jamison allegedly fired shots at two people walking along Sacramento Street near Woolsey around 12:41 pm on Dec. 23. Neighbors who heard the shots reported seeing two people flee east on Woolsey, prompting Berkeley police to do a house-by-house search of two-block area. Police called in a canine unit but were unable to locate the suspects.

In the meanwhile, someone took the two victims to a nearby hospital. One was treated and quickly released but the other was admitted. Both have since been released, according to Sgt. Mary Kusmiss of the Berkeley Police Department.

This was not a random shooting, according to the press release. The motive has not been identified.

Jamison was a student at Berkeley Technical High School during the 2010-2011 year and was featured in a May San Francisco Chronicle story about searching for his family roots.

Related:
Two shot on Sacramento Street [12.23.11]

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  • Anonymous

    18 years old.  What a waste.

  • Anonymous

    My hunch is he’ll find his family roots in the prison he’s going to.

  • justme

    I know this young man and I know his family.  They, including Tyler, were working so hard to change the way his life was heading.  The work was starting to payoff, Tyler was back in school and the family had hope.  Its so hard for these young men….people like the person below don’t understand the challenges and speak out of ignorance.  These boys have so many challenges and it’s such a slippery slope!  My heart goes out to all involved and I still have hope for the boys in this story.

  • lauram

    What kind of challenges allow for excusing committing such serious crimes as murder?

    Please educate those of us you describe as ignorant.

  • Bruce Love

    The person you are responding to excused no crime.  Please respect the community.

  • Bruce hate

    Tragic  for a young man to throw his life away? Sure, but he was trying to murder people  or anyone else in  his line of  sight.  
    Gun are created for one reason only: to KILL. He obviously didn’t learn that lesson.

  • lauram

    How about these young men respect the community and stop destroying our peace with the violence they feel entitled to act out with.

  • http://www.facebook.com/Jazzy510 Jamica Burks

    Well now we know this young man was set free in June 2012, no witnesses so the charges were dropped. And this past weekend this young man was killed… sad

  • Onelove

    Despite what the media has said and what all was implied Tyler was a great kid with alot of potential but they seem to have left that part out. Nobody seems to care that a life has been lost. Would you sympathize if he had never been caught up with the law? Or is his murder somehow justified because you think he was a bad person? Despite how you may feel nobody deserves to die and nobody should being playing god. If we were to focus on catching and keeping the suspects( who have not been caught) from being able to do this again then maybe just maybe their would be less gun violence or deaths. And what about Tyler’s family who will never get to see or hear from him again no final goodbye no last I love you. Parents can only hope to protect their children but as it has been proven time and time again every time we turn on the news or turn the page of a newspaper that realistically that just isnt possible. So my question is, if the youth is our future whose job is it to protect them? As a community as a people we must come together because the answe is it is all of our jobs and if its one thing that we all have in common its understanding the hurt and pain that comes with losing a loved one. Pointing the finger, turning the cheek, judging doesn’t make you a better person. What have you done to help stop violence in your community or surrounding communities? Talking is easier then taking action. My advice, get from behind the computer screen and start taking action to help prevent this from happening to someone else’s brother, nephew or even son. Tyler will forever be missed, loved and never forgotten. We as his family ask that you respect our wishes and let him rest in peace. You would have only been so lucky to have met him. Thank ou and god bless.Despite what the media has said and what all was implied Tyler was a great kid with alot of potential but they seem to have left that part out. Nobody seems to care that a life has been lost. Would you sympathize if he had never been caught up with the law? Or is his murder somehow justified because you think he was a bad person? Despite how you may feel nobody deserves to die and nobody should being playing god. If we were to focus on catching and keeping the suspects( who have not been caught) from being able to do this again then maybe just maybe their would be less gun violence or deaths. And what about Tyler’s family who will never get to see or hear from him again no final goodbye no last I love you. Parents can only hope to protect their children but as it has been proven time and time again every time we turn on the news or turn the page of a newspaper that realistically that just isnt possible. So my question is, if the youth is our future whose job is it to protect them? As a community as a people we must come together because the answe is it is all of our jobs and if its one thing that we all have in common its understanding the hurt and pain that comes with losing a loved one. Pointing the finger, turning the cheek, judging doesn’t make you a better person. What have you done to help stop violence in your community or surrounding communities? Talking is easier then taking action. My advice, get from behind the computer screen and start taking action to help prevent this from happening to someone else’s brother, nephew or even son. Tyler will forever be missed, loved and never forgotten. We as his family ask that you respect our wishes and let him rest in peace. You would have only been so luck to have met him. Thank you and god bless.