Monthly Archives: May 2012

News

The Berkeley Wire: 05.31.12

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Pop-up art show depicts 36 bird paintings done in 36 days

One of Kalen Meyer's 36 paintings of birds done in 36 days
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Thirty-six views of Mount Fuji is a famous series of prints done by the Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai from 1826 and 1833. The series, which depicted views of Mount Fuji in different seasons, has inspired Berkeley artist Kalen Meyer to try something similar. She spent the first 36 days of 2012 paintings birds and posting the work on a Tumblr page.

She chose birds not because she was a birder, but because they are a timeless image. “Now, of course, I see birds everywhere and each part of them is more vivid, their wings, tails, eyers and claws.”

Meyer is showing the bird paintings in a pop-up gallery show Friday June 1 from 5 to 9 pm and Saturday June 2 from 10 am to 5 pm. The show is in the shop space at the Delaware Apartments, at 1800 B San Pablo Avenue.

Meyer also did a similar series in 2006 when she painted 36 views of Mount Tamalpais. … Continue reading »

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Cal students win scholarships for sustainable agriculture

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Berkeley-based natural food company Annie’s Homegrown has awarded scholarships to two UC Berkeley students to support innovative new projects in the field of sustainable agriculture.

The scholarship program grew out of Annie’s mission of “providing a healthier, natural, organic alternative to traditional comfort food,” according to Staci Lucash, the company’s marketing coordinator.

Lucash says that the Sustainable Agriculture Scholarship program was started “to help the next generation of leaders and farmers to advance sustainable agriculture.”

This year, Annie’s awarded a total of $100,000 to 16 college students studying sustainable agriculture across the United States. Winners of the scholarship are chosen with the help of Annie’s co-founder Annie Withey, who now runs an organic farm in Connecticut, based on their academic pursuits, extracurricular activities, leadership positions, and future plans to encourage sustainable agriculture. … Continue reading »

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Popular restaurants closed by fires face further delays

All that remains of the Sequoia Building is the one-story façade on Telegraph that housed Café Intermezzo and Raleigh's. Photos: Lance Knobel
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It looks like a number of Berkeley restaurants won’t be recovering as quickly as hoped from a recent set of fires.

The Daily Californian is reporting that the proposal to erect temporary tents to replace Café Intermezzo and Café Raleigh, which were destroyed Nov. 18 when the Sequoia Building burned down, hasn’t gone forward. Property owner Greg Ent submitted a permit application in January, but has not responded to changes requested in mid-March by the city. Ent has also stopped talking to the project’s architect, Kirk Peterson, according to the Daily Cal.

“The latest I’ve heard is a rumor that the (Ent’s) insurance company’s money couldn’t be used for the temporary structures,” City councilmember Kriss Worthington told the paper. “That may mean the owner of the building has switched gears from the temporary operation into looking at getting into a permanent building operation.” … Continue reading »

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Government

City, citizens debate substandard streets, a closed pool

Measure M will provide more funds for improving streets, but it still will fall short of the need. Photo: Tracey Taylor
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The bulk of this week’s City Council meeting was consumed by public comment and councilmember debate on potential city measures for the November general election ballot.

The three areas considered by the council — streets and watershed, affordable housing, and pools — are facing considerable headwinds to reach the necessary two-thirds vote by the public, according to a community survey commissioned by the city. The survey of 400 likely voters by Lake Research Partners concluded that only the streets and watershed measures has a chance to pass in November (details on the survey at the bottom of this article).

That conclusion, however, was passionately challenged by both pools and affordable housing advocates on Tuesday night. Pools supporters are seeking $6.4 million to renovate and reopen Willard Pool, and $13 million to build a new warm pool (both would also need parcel taxes to fund ongoing operations). The housing measure would impose a 2% gross receipts tax on landlords with five units or more, with the revenues used to support affordable housing. … Continue reading »

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It’s a Berkeley world after all as music hits streets, park

Rito reinoso
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Just as Berkeley starts settling into its pleasingly sleepy summer rhythm, the 9th Annual World Music Festival takes over Telegraph on Saturday, infusing the avenue with a jolt of energy. Running from noon to 9 pm, the free musical fest brings an international array of music to cafés and shops south of campus, with the action centering on the Amoeba-sponsored People’s Park stage from 1-6 pm.

While the music is global in scope, the artists are local, highlighting the wealth of talent, homegrown and adopted, that abides among us. Maria Muldaur headlines at People’s Park, kicking off the last set at 4:30 pm. While still best known for her 1974 pop hit “Midnight At the Oasis,” she’s an authoritative blues singer with a good feel for jazz who has honed a rootsy Gulf Coast sound with her Red Hot Bluesiana Band.

Other featured acts include the ferociously grooving Cuban dance music of Fito Reynoso y su Ritmo y Armonia (People’s Park 2:45 pm); the sensuous tangos of Trio Garufa (The Village 7 pm); the joyous Manouche swing of Duo Gadjo (Caffé Mediterraneum noon); the incantatory Shona percussion and thumb piano of Sadza Marimba & Mbira (Haste and Telegraph 1 pm); and the Moroccan trance rhythms of percussionist Bouchaib Abdelhadi with oud master Yassir Chadly (Rasputin Music 4 pm). … Continue reading »

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News

The Berkeley Wire: 05.30.12

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Chocolate and Chalk Festival promises to be delicious fun

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It’s time to eat chocolate and get creative with chalk — what’s not to like about that? This year’s Chocolate & Chalk Art Festival takes place on Saturday June 2, 10:00 am-5:00 pm, in the Gourmet Ghetto — and, as a proud media sponsor, Berkeleyside will have a booth there. So come say hello when you’ve sampled enough of the cacao products.

Admission is free to this perennially favorite, family-friendly Berkeley event. Areas of the sidewalks on Shattuck between Rose and Vine Streets will be assigned to participants to create their own fanciful chalk drawings. A Chalk Art Contest for the best drawing will be judged after 4 p.m. (First prize is $250 cash and runners-up get a gift certificate from Philz Coffee — see last year’s winners.)

To eat chocolate, start by purchasing a packet of tickets (20 for $20) at event booths located at 1400, 1495 and 1673 Shattuck Ave. The to-go menu features picante habañero chocolate chunks gelato, Nutella crepes, adult brownies, or savory chocolate ricotta pizza, Caribbean chocolate soup, chicken molé and lots more. Spend your tickets on these delights available in the local businesses then savor your chocolate as you stroll along the sidewalks, viewing the artwork. … Continue reading »

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Council hears police, transit plans, appoints city manager

All of the city's department heads stood at the back of the hall for the appointment of Christine Daniel as city manager. Photo: Lance Knobel
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The largest part of last night’s City Council meeting was consumed by public comment and council debate over potential ballot measures for the November election (full report coming later). But a number of other important items were on the agenda as well.

Police community engagement

At a special, one-hour meeting before the regular council, Berkeley Police Department Captain Andy Greenwood presented a number of new community engagement initiatives, including an online crime reporting system, a revamped CrimeView site, and an expanded program of “coffee with the commanders”.

The online reporting system, dubbed CopLogic, enables residents to self-report non-emergency matters, where there are no witnesses or suspects. Greenwood said the types of crimes where the system could prove helpful include auto burglary and theft from autos, identity theft, petty theft, harassing phone calls, and vandalism. … Continue reading »

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Bayer unveils Berkeley’s largest solar installation

Bayer solar panels
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Yesterday, Bayer Healthcare’s manufacturing facility in west Berkeley unveiled the city’s largest solar installation. Mayor Tom Bates cut the ribbon to the 1,000-panel installation which provides shading to Bayer’s parking lot, and was designed and installed by SolarCity.

At 295 kilowatts, the system is nearly three times as large as any other installation in the city and will help offset more than 10 million pounds of greenhouse gas emissions over the next 20 years.

“Bayer has a global commitment to CO2 reduction,” Joerg Heidrich, SVP Product Supply Biotech and head of the Berkeley site said in a prepared statement. “We have learned that achieving these goals takes action on many fronts. Last year our water use declined by 14% over 2010, and solid waste was reduced by 20%. This new solar installation is one more step in our efforts and we look forward to working with the City of Berkeley to achieve our shared goals in climate protection.” … Continue reading »

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Three Squares benefit to help free cooking class program

Three Squares volunteers with Kitchen on Fire chef Olivier Said. Photo: Sarah Nelson
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For the past three years Sarah Nelson has run free cooking classes for low-income families under three different names. While working as a special projects coordinator for the Pacific Coast Farmers’ Market she brought the program then known as Operation Frontline to the Bay Area.

That effort, a national initiative sponsored by the nonprofit Share our Strength, changed its name to the more apt Cooking Matters in October 2010. Last August, when Nelson left the farmers’ market, she took the cooking class concept with her and now heads up the non-profit organization Three Squares, which is holding a fundraising brunch at UC Berkeley’s Pauley Ballroom this Sunday.

Name changes aside, the core concept of this program remains the same: six weeks of cooking instruction that focuses on kitchen skills, fresh foods, and meal planning for those in need. Three Squares is a lean operation: in addition to Nelson, 31, the staff includes three AmeriCorps members and relies on 400 volunteers to teach about 15 classes a week in the Bay Area, typically two each week in Berkeley. … Continue reading »

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Where in Berkeley?

Where in Berkeley?

Know where this is? Take a guess and let us know in the Comments.

Update, 9:52am: Jef Poskanzer got this one very quickly.  This is the roof of a building located at the northeast corner of San Pablo Avenue and Jones Street. The building, 1499 San Pablo Avenue, is occupied by Auto Alpina, a car repair shop. Congratulations, Jef, on being this week’s winner!

Photo: Neil Mishalov.

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News

The Berkeley Wire: 05.29.12

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