UCPD officer in hospital after accidental shooting

A veteran officer of the University of California Police Department was taken to the hospital Tuesday morning after he accidentally shot himself in the leg while holstering his weapon, officials said.

Lt. Eric Tejada of the university Police Department said authorities are investigating whether an equipment malfunction may have resulted in the shooting.

Tejada said the officer was getting dressed for work around 8 a.m. when he shot himself in the leg with his Heckler & Koch semi-automatic pistol. Other officers in the locker room provided comfort and first aid until the Berkeley Fire Department arrived. Paramedics then transported the officer to Highland Hospital for medical care.

Tejada declined to release the officer’s name, but said the man’s wounds did not appear to be life threatening.

“We’re doing an investigation to find out how it happened,” he said. “We’re interviewing everyone in the locker room with him. It could have been an issue with the equipment itself.”

Tejada said officers generally have their loaded guns in their lockers as they get into uniform and prepare to holster their weapons.

“Nothing like this has ever happened to us,” he said. “We train all the time in weapons safety. It was an accidental discharge and we’re looking at what might have caused it.”

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  • Joe

    Negligent discharge, not accidental, Tejada.

    Glock leg strikes again…but with an HK?  Those things have like 12lb trigger pulls in DA…

    Hope the officer is ok, but seriously people, let’s remember what Cooper taught us.

  • moi

    No idea what Cooper taught you, unless it was Agent Cooper from Twin Peaks. Care to elucidate?

    But yes, it must be operator error. How does he do with his pepper spray?

    Of course I have sympathy for the victim, but must admit I laughed out loud when I read the headline…

  • Joe

    Jeff Cooper.

    4 rules:
    1) All guns are always loaded.
    2) Never let the muzzle cover anything you are not willing to destroy.
    3) Keep your finger off the trigger till your sights are on the target.4) Identify your target, and what is behind it.

    These are/should be taught to anyone before they handle a firearm.  Unfortunately, most LEAs do not require adequate training or range time for their officers (POST only mandates 24 hrs I think, which includes chemical training), and scheduling concerns make it nearly impossible for LEOs to maintain good shooting habits and safety.

  • http://acme.com/jef/ Jef Poskanzer

     Yeah, the surprise is that it’s not a Glock.

  • moi

    Thanks! I’m a Conscientious Objector and think all firearms whold be melted down. But those are good rules for anything, from a microphone to a car, or words!

  • Foo

     4) see Rule 1)

  • john4620

    Anybody have any idea what kind of holster he was using??  Know he was using an HK, but wonder if it was a holster malfunction; what kind it was???

  • Sixdooz

    I hope that the officer gets back to duty soon but, he/she needs to exercise some reflection and remember that we must know our equipment and its limitations. Yes this was a classic case of negligence.