Crime

Berkeleyside Police Blotter: Crime in Berkeley, Feb. 7-13

Selected calls for service to the Berkeley Police Department, Feb. 7-13, 2013, via CrimeMapping.com. Click the map for a full list of incidents. The green icons represent vandalism or fraud; the red icons represent physical violence; the blue icons with a white mask represent robberies. The purple icons show vehicle thefts or weapon-related calls. The blue icons marked with “SC” show a reported sexual assault. The pink icons are drug-related calls. Click the map for a full list of calls.

Selected calls for service to the Berkeley Police Department, Feb. 7-13, 2013, via CrimeMapping.com. (Scroll down for maps that show home and auto burglaries.) The green icons represent fraud; the red icons represent physical violence; the blue icons with a white mask represent robberies. The purple icons show vehicle thefts or weapon-related calls. The blue icons marked “SC” show reported sexual assaults. The pink icons are drug-related calls. Click the map for a full list of calls.

This is a partial list of recent crimes in Berkeley, compiled by Berkeleyside, and based on reports to the Berkeley Police Department unless otherwise noted. See past crime blotters here. (Note to readers: We always appreciate tips about breaking news or neighborhood safety issues, via email at tips@berkeleyside.com.)

The following items represent just a sampling of calls, and times may be approximate. From Feb. 7-13, there were 19 burglary reports25 auto break-in or theft from a vehicle reports, and seven stolen vehicle reports to the Berkeley Police Department, according to CrimeMapping.comSix robberies and four assaults, domestic violence incidents or batteries were reported. These numbers are subject to change. Click the previous links for the most current information.

Feb. 7, Thursday

A commercial burglary was reported at 5:50 a.m. in the 1700 block of Shattuck Avenue.

Two home burglaries were reported, at 6 a.m. in the 2700 block of Dohr Street, and at 9:15 a.m. in the 1300 block of Carleton Street.

Three vehicles were burglarized: at 11:45 a.m. at Ninth and Parker streets; at 12:04 at University Avenue and Seawall Drive; and at 6:30 p.m. in the 700 block of Hearst Avenue.

A vehicle was reported stolen from the 2100 block of Seventh Street at noon.

Feb. 8, Friday

A thief stole something from a vehicle at Hillegass Avenue and Parker at 8 a.m. Three other vehicles were burglarized: at noon in the 1700 block of University; at 12:30 p.m. in the 2000 block of Fourth; and at 11 p.m. in the 1900 block of Seventh.

A felony theft (over $950) was reported in the 1500 block of Prince Street at 8:30 a.m. Another was reported just before 6:30 p.m. in the 900 block of Heinz Avenue.

Three home burglaries were reported: at noon in the 2300 block of Parker; at 8:30 p.m. in the 1100 block of University; and at 9 p.m. in the 1700 block of Shattuck.

A vehicle was reported stolen at 3 p.m. from Highland Place and Hearst, and at 10 p.m. in the 1800 block of Oxford Street. Someone also reported a stolen vehicle to the University of California Police Department, at 3:40 p.m. from the Foothill Lot near Cyclotron Road.

A business was reported to have been burglarized at 7:15 p.m. in the 1400 block of University.

A felony sexual assault was reported at 8 p.m. in the 1100 block of University.

There were 19 home or commercial burglaries reported in Berkeley from Feb. 6-13, via CrimeMapping.com. The prior week, there were 17. Click the map to see a list of incidents.

There were 19 home or commercial burglaries reported in Berkeley from Feb. 6-13, via CrimeMapping.com. The prior week, there were 17. Click the map to see a list of incidents.

Feb. 9, Saturday 

A felony theft (over $950) was reported at 2:30 a.m. in the 2600 block of Benvenue Avenue.

Four auto burglaries were reported: at 5:45 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. in the 2300 block of Fourth Street; and at 7 p.m. and 8:20 p.m. in the 2200 block of Haste Street.

Someone reported a stolen vehicle to the University of California Police Department at 6:49 p.m. from Structure H, near Bancroft and Barrow Lane.

A robbery was reported in the 1300 block of San Pablo Avenue at 7:54 p.m.

A home burglary was reported in the 2700 block of Haste Street at 11 p.m.

Feb. 10, Sunday

Two vehicles were reported stolen, at 11:50 a.m. from the 400 block of Gilman Street, and at 9:30 p.m. from the 2300 block of Piedmont Avenue.

Two auto burglaries were reported: at about 5 p.m. in the 700 block of Allston Way, and at 9:45 p.m. in the 400 block of San Mateo Road.

Two commercial burglaries were reported, at 5:23 p.m. in the 900 block of Allston and just before 6 p.m. in the 2000 block of Eighth Street.

Feb. 11, Monday

A misdemeanor sexual assault was reported at 2:18 a.m. in the 2100 block of Bancroft Way.

Four home burglaries were reported: at 7:15 a.m. in the 1000 block of Keeler Avenue; at 7:30 a.m. in the 2300 block of Acton Street; at 8 a.m. in the 1000 block of Spruce Street; and at 10:30 a.m. in the 900 block of Hilldale Avenue.

A vehicle was reported stolen from the 1200 block of Haskell Street at 5:30 p.m.

A robbery was reported at Etna and Derby streets at 7:45 p.m.

A theft from a vehicle was reported at 8 p.m. from the 800 block of Neilson Street. Two auto burglaries were reported: at 10 p.m. in the 2300 block of Howe Street, and at 11:30 p.m. at Ninth and Dwight Way.

There were 25 thefts or burglaries from vehicles reported in Berkeley from Feb. 7-13, via CrimeMapping.com. The same number was reported the prior week. Click the map to see a list of incidents.

There were 25 thefts or burglaries from vehicles reported in Berkeley from Feb. 7-13, via CrimeMapping.com. The same number was reported the prior week. Click the map to see a list of incidents.

Feb. 12, Tuesday

Four auto burglaries and one theft from a vehicle were reported: at 12:01 a.m. in the 2700 block of Ninth; at 11:30 a.m. in both the 2300 block of Fourth and the 1700 block of Hopkins Street; at 2:15 p.m. in the 1100 block of San Pablo; and at 9 p.m. in the 400 block of Gilman Street.

Three robberies were reported: at 9:40 a.m. in the 2900 block of Stanton Street; at 6:25 p.m. in the 1300 block of Virginia Street; and at 9:20 p.m. at San Pablo and Cedar Street.

A felony theft (over $950) was reported at 3:29 p.m. in the 2300 block of Shattuck Avenue.

Feb. 13, Wednesday

Four home burglaries were reported: at 7:50 a.m. in the 1700 block of Marin Avenue; at 9 a.m. in the 2800 block of California Street; at 11:45 a.m. in the 600 block of Arlington Avenue; and at 5:30 p.m. in the 1500 block of Beverly Place.

There were also four auto burglaries reported: at 8:10 a.m. at California and Russell Street; at 11:55 a.m. in the 1000 block of Ashby Avenue; at 3:34 p.m. in the 100 block of Seawall; and at 8:30 p.m. at San Pablo and Addison Street.

A vehicle was reported stolen from the 1100 block of Hearst at noon.

A gun or weapon was reported in the 1700 block of Alcatraz Avenue at 2:45 p.m.

A commercial burglary was reported in the 2400 block of McKinley Avenue at 6 p.m.

Arson was reported in the 1600 block of Edith Street at 10:15 p.m.

A robbery was reported at 10:27 p.m. at Euclid and Hilgard avenues.

See the full list of Berkeley Police Department calls for service here on CrimeMapping.com. This may have been updated since publication. See the list of calls to the UC Police Department. See also Local Crime News’ regularly published list of arrests of Berkeley residents. Other sources of information on crime in Berkeley include the Police Department’s CrimeView Community and CrimeMapping.com.

[Editor’s Note: New calls for service are at times added to the CrimeMapping.com system in an unpredictable manner, and numbers for most types of calls are likely to increase in the days following this report. This weekly post offers a relatively detailed account of calls for service over the course of a week but does not reflect every call.]

Want to get breaking news, including about crimes, quickly? Follow Berkeleyside on Twitter and download the free Berkeleyside iPhone app.

Print Friendly
Tagged , , ,
  • guest

    it would be helpful if this was listed by geographical area/neighborhood so readers can scroll through and see the areas that pertain to them.

  • guest123

    The map sort of does that. This is already much better than what BPD provides.

  • emraguso

    I was thinking about that too but logistically it would be a challenge. If you want location-specific info, go to crimemapping.com and input your address. You can select date range, crime types, etc. This post is intended to be an overview of the entire city. (Though you can also get a sense of what’s happening in your area from the maps.) I’ll keep it under consideration though. I could imagine that being helpful — perhaps organized by area the way the police department does it.

  • bgal4

    >9 a.m. in the 2800 block of California Street

    the darling juvenile arrested for this incident is responsible for a multitude of crimes. He lives in section 8 housing and is a school drop out. Hey, 2020 Vision do-gooders please get him out of our here.

  • heh

    but we need him for “diversity”

  • foobar

    I don’t see where it says anyone was arrested for this. Also, do these home burglars frequently strike that early in the morning? Aren’t people still at home eating breakfast then? At least I am.

  • emraguso

    Arrest information isn’t available in the same system as the crime reports; we don’t have ready access to that but we’re trying to figure out a good way to know more.

  • bgal4

    I live here, I saw the arrest. I only make true statements.

  • bgal4

    Juvie, not public info

  • Bill N

    The actual Crime Mapping web site gives you distances from your home or the address you enter. Pretty interesting.

  • bingo

    isn’t 2400 McKinley like 2 blocks from the BPD station? for crying out loud.

  • PragmaticProgressive

    Yes, but the drug dealing in Civic Center Park is right across the street and that hasn’t mattered either.

  • curiousjorge

    how do you know he lives in section 8 housing?

  • bgal4

    r u kidding me! how do you think we know the biographies of those who prey on us?

  • bgal4

    r u kidding? how do you think we obtain the biographies of local offenders who prey on us?

  • curiousjorge

    its not like the housing authority hangs a sign on the outside of the building that says “this apartment is subsidized through the housing choice voucher program”, so I was just wondering how you figured that out. if its true he lives in section 8 then his first offense would likely have resulted in the eviction of his entire family.

  • bgal4

    HUD subsidized public housing, easy to identify.

    Next false assumption; when and how BHA triggers an investigation into criminal activity by a tenant. Citizen complaints generally. For years the city’s policy has been to prohibit BPD from notifying BHA about a specific tenant or property. As you likely know a citizen driven federal audit forced local housing authority compliance and changes in practice. Eventually, BPD agreed to forward monthly arrest dockets to BHA, which is a legally defensive practice. Feel free to check with BPD to see if they are still forwarding arrests dockets to BHA, I doubt it.

  • curiousjorge

    I can say with certainty that BPD is still forwarding crime reports to BHA. I defend tenants against section 8 terminations ;)

  • bgal4

    BPD forwards reports only after BHA submits a request based on a legitimate complaint. If you defend tenants, you should have known this distinction. I figured you as a tenant advocate just calling me out, mistaken and misrepresenting information.

  • curiousjorge

    I’m not calling anyone out, I was just curious how you concluded that the kid lives in section 8 housing. but you are incorrect about the BPD to BHA forwarding policy – there’s no “submits a request based on a legitimate complaint” process involved. the BPD forwarding process is address-based.

  • bgal4

    We disagree. and this latest arrest came after a stint in juvie, so obviously that prior was not investigated by BHA.

  • 4Eenie

    There have been some incidents over the years that have occurred in the Section 8 housing near my house (unabashed drug dealing being the top offense), and I have called the police a few times. So should I call the police AND BHA next time I see some illegal behavior happening? If so, I have the police #. Can either of you let me know the number to BHA so I can keep it in case I find it necessary? Thanks.

  • curiousjorge

    you still haven’t explained how you concluded that the kid lives in section 8 housing ;) there is a wide variety of housing subsidies, including subsidies administered by entities other than BHA. Living near or on Sojourner Truth court is not enough information to figure out whether his family’s housing is subsidized through section 8 – he could be visiting a grandparent living in Oregon Park for example. And unfortunately we send kids to juvenile hall for all sorts of reasons, not just criminal activity.

  • bgal4

    9815470

    and yeah if you suspect federal violations give BHA the address, no harm done in checking. Unless it is obviously public housing the police are prohibited from checking into the tenants status, so they need residents complaints.

  • 4Eenie

    Thanks, bgal4!

  • curiousjorge

    How it actually works: BPD keeps a daily log of various crimes. The daily log is forwarded to BHA, who reviews the names and addresses of suspects to match them against members of subsidized households. Then the household gets a termination notice, based upon the BPD police report and any search warrants executed by BPD. often, the termination notice arrives before any criminal proceedings are commenced – you can be evicted even if you’re found innocent of the criminal charges, often before you’ve even been tried. Thanks to Bill Clinton, one strike is all it takes to evict a whole family from subsidized housing.

    bgal4, I actually think you and I would get along. we may not see eye to eye on evictions, but I’d bet we agree on most other things :)

  • bgal4

    Now I know for sure that your legal advice is problematic. do enlighten us

    >we send kids to juvenile hall for all sorts of reasons, not just criminal activity.

  • bgal4

    I get along with all sorts, I grew up in a large family without the luxury of money, so you learn the hard way.

  • djt

    More information on methods would be really helpful; it would help defend against crime. Like how burglars entered a home. How a strong arm robbery was conducted. etc. After an attempted robbery at gunpoint (attempt failed, flight was effective in that case), I realized that the clicking noise I heard earlier in the area was someone playing with their gun. Stories of failed criminal activity would be helpful too. For example, someone wrote about being “bike jacked” on MLK at night; I ride there at night. Knowing how the event was initiated can help people avoid being the next victim. Hearing stories about people noting license plates or pursuing in their cars would be empowering for others. Make our town a disaster for criminal activity.

  • curiousjorge

    how harsh! and here I thought we were starting to get along ;) kids get sent to the hall for violating court orders, doing things adults are allowed to do (alcohol for example), and school discipline reasons, among many other non-criminal reasons. Also, juvenile suspects are held in the hall while awaiting ajudication. Personally, I’m partial to “innocent until proven guilty”.

  • bgal4

    last response to you.

    Your understanding of the offenses that could send a person to juvenile hall is SERIOUSLY flawed.

  • guest

    Definitely Holland, Lord, Offer-Westort, or one of their mouthpieces.

  • curiousjorge

    not a mouthpiece for anyone but myself. my partner works to keep kids out of the hall and whose office represents kids in juvenile proceedings. what’s your involvement with the hall, bgal4?