Suspect in Santa Cruz killings had lived in Berkeley

goulet

Jeremy Peter Goulet

A man suspected of shooting and killing two Santa Cruz police officers on Tuesday had lived in Berkeley and worked as a barista at Cole Coffee on the Oakland-Berkeley border, according to media reports.

Jeremy Peter Goulet, 35, was shot and killed by police not long after two officers were killed at a house in Santa Cruz while answering a call, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

Santa Cruz Police Chief Kevin Vogel confirmed Wednesday that the officers were killed while trying to arrest a suspect; Vogel identified them as Detective Sgt. Loran Baker and Detective Elizabeth Butler. The officers were answering a call at an address about a mile northeast of downtown at around 3:30 p.m. when the suspect opened fire.

Records show that Goulet, who had moved to Santa Cruz in September, was listed as having been a resident at an apartment complex on Benvenue Ave. near Derby St. in the Elmwood neighborhood of Berkeley. He appears to have been arrested last Friday, Feb. 22, in Santa Cruz on suspicion of drunk and disorderly conduct.

According to the Chronicle, Goulet was a licensed pilot living in Santa Cruz and had previously been living with his twin brother at an apartment on Benvenue. He also was a former Marine and military police officer, according to Oregon Live.

The Santa Cruz Sentinel reported that Goulet, who was said to have had three weapons registered to him, including a .40-caliber semi-automatic Sig Sauer and a Baretta, was fired Saturday from a job as a barista at a Santa Cruz coffee shop, possibly because of sexual harassment toward a female co-worker. Goulet had allegedly broken into the co-worker’s home Friday night and had made unwanted sexual advances toward her, according to the paper. She had filed a report with police.

Goulet had been arrested two other times for peeping at naked women, according to Oregon Live.  In 2008, Goulet was sentenced to three years probation for peeping at a woman as she showered in her condominium in Portland, Ore., according to Oregon Live.  He was ordered to undergo sex-offender treatment after he admitted he used his cell phone to video women surreptitiously. He had had an earlier peeping conviction in California in 2000, according to the news report.

In the Oregon case, Goulet had also been charged with a misdemeanor for carrying a concealed weapon without a permit, according to Oregon Live. The boyfriend of the woman Goulet spied on spotted him near her home and jumped on him. Goulet shot off the gun during the ensuing scuffle, although he later told the court he was not trying to kill the boyfriend.

When Goulet could not get along with his probation officer, he opted to go to jail, where he served two years, according to the Sentinel. 

Officer Baker, a 28-year veteran of the Santa Cruz Police Department, leaves behind a wife, two daughters and a son who is a community service officer with the Santa Cruz Police Department, officials said. Officer Butler, who had been with the force for 10 years, leaves behind her partner and two young sons.

Police Chief  Vogel said Wednesday: “This is the darkest day in the history of the Santa Cruz Police Department.”

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  • bgal4

    I join the Santa Cruz police dept and community in mourning the loss of these public servants.
    He looks similar to the suspect in the sketch from recent rape.

  • Jobabes

    Im mourning the man who killed the police officers

  • dana

    Why would u mourn that fuckin idiot who killed the police officers

  • terrya

    Obviously he had a mental illness. Very sad.

  • robin gist

    what,is,wrong with people in the world and california

    No offense but ..I’m not from.here and have lived,here for twenty plus years …I’ve traveled all the country n been out of it once and never meet people as racist arrogant and ads backwards as the people in L.a and California..I also own Absecon an.business..have published an book own.and,manage an.fundraiser work am an currently an med student as,well as being an domestic violence and cancer survivor and mother to children.living and past ..
    Robin gist in,

  • Tim

    So, you want to have a gun control discussion now? A guy with this many problems, so many brushes with the law, and he still has the right to possess guns. Society, once and for all needs to have laws in place that take away guns from dangerous people.

  • batardo

    He wasn’t previously convicted of any felonies or violent crimes. What’s your point? Ban guns for everybody convicted of misdemeanor offenses? What exactly would you propose that we codify into law?

    If you want to take away rights based on what people MIGHT do someday, then you should be cautious about opening that pandora’s box.

  • guest

    I’m confused. Am I supposed to be scared about living in Berkeley because this guys used to live here? Or am i supposed to be glad that he moved to Santa Cruz?
    Tell me, oh media gods!

  • NRPax

    Those laws already exist. Take it up with the police and with government for not enforcing them.

  • guest

    Looks like the warning signs were there. How awful. He should have been put away for a long long time and instead just kept going on in his predictable fashion. So sorry to the families of the officers.

  • bgal4

    Funding enforcement is the issue. see AG report to state legislators in Sept.2012

  • NRPax

    Yet a lot of people seem to think the lack of laws is the problem.

  • EarlyMorningCoffee

    Does anyone remember him when he worked at Cole?

  • http://berkeleyside.com Tracey Taylor

    A few readers on our Facebook page recall being served coffee by him: http://www.facebook.com/berkeleyside/posts/309391695830151

  • Daniel M

    I absolutely remember him, and there was nothing outwardly unusual about him whatsoever. I’m sitting at Cole right now and I’m really having trouble digesting the idea that someone who I had some sort of regular interaction with went on to kill two innocent people. I wonder if he left his job at Cole for a reason similar to why he lost his job in Santa Cruz.

  • guest

    Be suspected of killing a police officer: die without a trial.

  • Berkeley_born

    Offense taken. Your inability to separate these events from your purblind observations of California mesh well with your inability to communicate.

  • http://twitter.com/kinglet749 kinglet749

    A lot of people on Berkeleyside also appear to have a mental illness. “Die without a trial”? So we’ll just give the guy a fair trial, as he keeps shooting people. What a great idea.

  • Charles_Siegel

    “In the Oregon case, Goulet had also been charged with a misdemeanor for
    carrying a concealed weapon without a permit, according to Oregon Live.
    The boyfriend of the woman Goulet spied on spotted him near her home and
    jumped on him. Goulet shot off the gun during the ensuing scuffle,
    although he later told the court he was not trying to kill the
    boyfriend.”

    Is this quote about what he MIGHT do?

  • guest

    Let’s just execute everyone suspected of murder with no trials.
    What a great idea.

  • I’m Jes’ Sayin’

    “Suspected” of killing [a] police officer?

  • 4Eenie

    I’ve told you a million times not to exaggerate.

  • http://twitter.com/kinglet749 kinglet749

    Wile you’re at it, you should be proud of him for peeping on and harassing innocent women, because they probably asked for it, and explaining how the world treated him badly, he was actually a model citizen. God, I don’t understand people like you.

  • guest

    “A man suspected of shooting and killing two Santa Cruz police officers on Tuesday had lived in Berkeley and worked as a barista at Cole Coffee on the Oakland-Berkeley border, according to media reports.

    Jeremy Peter Goulet, 35, was shot and killed by police not long after two officers were killed at a house in Santa Cruz while answering a call, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.”

    Also see title of post.

  • guest

    “So we’ll just give the guy a fair trial, as he keeps shooting people. What a great idea.”

    I just turned this on its head.

  • http://twitter.com/kinglet749 kinglet749

    Okay. What are officers supposed to do when someone is SHOOTING AT AND KILLING them??

  • 4Eenie

    congrats.

  • bgal4

    I suspect the detectives were trying to interview him as a suspect in the recent rape, check out the suspect sketch.

  • batardo

    I read that article too, what do YOU think it says that he did? Carrying an un-permitted concealed weapon is a non-violent misdemeanor. Getting attacked by somebody else makes you a victim, not a perpetrator. At what point should his rights be curtailed and on what legal basis?

    Should access to guns be curtailed for every person who is convicted of a non-violent misdemeanor and infraction (shoplifters, speeders, parking tickets, etc.)? If not, would you draw the line differently from where we draw it today?

  • iicisco

    While the sense of one’s importance in Los Angeles/LACo is often boasted, I wouldn’t generalize everyone down south and in the greater LACo area as racist. There are racist in every city, state, country etc. However, I’m not sure how we’re supposed to take you seriously with your poor sentence structure and grammar.

  • I’m Jes’ Sayin’

    Clearly what the police spokespersons so artfully said is not what officers on the scene witnessed. {Also keep in mind that Mr. Goulet is reported to have shot a man who was attempting to defend his partner against whom Goulet was committing a crime.)

  • Sadtoseeit

    What a terrible end to a troubled man(taking other lives with him). With a twin, this must be such a horrid thing for his family. This is what the shooter’s father says:

    http://www.santacruzsentinel.com/localnews/ci_22680200/father-california-police-shooting-suspect-says-son-was?source=pkg

  • Tizzielish

    I think that if we were very, very strict about any and all gun ownership violations, such as carrying a concealed weapon without a permit to do so, which could be seen as analogous to how society has cracked down on drunk driving — you would see greatly reduced gun violations. It means something when a person violates the law related to gun carrying even if the law only counts it as a misdemeanor — it means the person is sneaky about guns, for one thing.

    It used to be folks could get their driver’s license back very easily after drunk drtiving offenses. I know. i used to earn a lot of money repping DWI’s — it was easy money, then, esay to plea down to a lesser offense. then people mobilized against the social problem of drunk drivings killing humans because the laws were laxly enforced and eventually there was no prosecutorial discretion: you got busted driving drunk, and you faced a license suspension autonatically, as it should be.

    there is no reason not to be very very strict with gun laws, even the misdemeanor ones. it means something when a person flaunts the law, esp. gun laws, Such violations are a red flag, pointing to a person who does not respect gun laws — just the kind of people who should not easily have access to guns, I say.-

  • Tizzielish

    we need to see a mobilization similar to Mothers AGainst Drunk Drivers to force politiians, police and government to enforce laws that already exist and advocagte to tougher laws to prevent senseless deaths. It worked with drunk driving.

  • bgal4

    Because like Goulet, Jobabes is a cop hater. Gotta wonder if she/he is a member of CopWatch.

    Goulet’s father described his son as a ‘ticking time bomb, hostile to the justice system.”

    To these people cops are not human beings, they are enforcers of personal oppression.
    Just look how OPD is treated, yet they continue day after day, putting their lives on the line doing a tough job without sufficient support.

    This is yet another example of the anti-law and order mentality being a serious threat to a just society.

  • guest

    I seem to be reading a different article. I see no description of a firefight: in fact I believe this man was shot and killed at a different location than the policemen. (let me say that I do see their death as a tragedy: and I hope that in fact they got the right man) (I do however believe in due process)

  • http://www.facebook.com/alinacon Alina Constantinescu

    I agree. The misdemeanor was related to guns. It was not a parking ticket or a shop lifting offense. In this case, I’d like to see the law changed.

  • guest

    Thanks.
    (taking and argument to its logical conclusion, my dear 4eenie)

  • bgal4

    Try reading news account of what transpired. Goulet is responsible for his own death.
    He was an ex- military cop, he killed the detectives in cold blood, took their guns, car and body armor and started a gun battle which put ordinary folks in the line of fire.

    this is one of the comments that make me want to shout just STFU

  • guest

    “Look how the OPD is treated”

    Oh, come ON.

    Ever heard of the “Rough Riders”?

    Ever seen the footage of the attacks of peaceful #Occupy protestors? (before ANY aggressive behavior)

  • guest

    How do you know? Where you there? Or have you read an eyewitness account?

  • NRPax

    I disagree on the last part. We already have enough laws covering misuse of guns. New ones aren’t going to make this problem disappear any more than new laws stopped drunk driving.

  • guest

    Welp, I stand corrected: looks like there was indeed a shootout according the above link.
    In that case, I guess this was a justified self-defense killing.

  • guest

    Having read a link recently posted with a more accurate description of what took place, it looks like this man actually was killed in self-defense. So I withdraw previous arguments based on misleading terms/ information.

  • guest

    Well, bgal4, I thought I WAS reading a news account of what transpired, but it turns out that the link above has much clearer and more accurate information. So, I withdraw the concern/ argument.
    You bring up another concern, though: look at all these messed-up veterans! Whay aren’t we getting them proper care, and tracking them so that they don’t become dangers to themselves and others????

  • bgal4

    This guy was a sexual assault perpetrator who did not want to go back to jail.

  • bgal4

    Of course. And I also know of the incredible work OPD does with just 600 cops in a violent gang ridden city.

  • guest

    Also an ex-military cop.
    BUT: none of that qualified him for capital punishment.
    Shooting at people got him (rightly) killed in self defense. ( I would go into the “shoot the kneecaps thing, but I’m just to tired right now)
    You didn’t address my point about veterans, though… remember Christopher Dorner just a little bit ago?

  • guest

    Well, good for the good ones, and shame on the bad ones. If they would stop protecting the corrupt policemen from justice, i would have a lot more respect for the police.

  • berkeley resident

    This is so far fetched. But he looks like a guy I had a run-in with at the Faculty housing complex off Addison/Jefferson street. He was trying to get into the building and was mad at me and my family because he thought we lived there and wouldn’t let him in. Anyways, I know, far fetched, but if anyone reading this lives there and remembers this guy it would be interesting.