Events

The It List: Five things to do in Berkeley this weekend

PamelaRose_29rLRALL THAT JAZZ The second annual JazzGirls Day will be at Berkeley High on Saturday, Mar. 9. JazzGirls Day is for girls only, aged 10 and older, who play jazz or are thinking about trying it out. Participants are invited to join professional female jazz musicians and educators for the afternoon. Among those leading master classes and jam sessions are singer Pamela Rose (see photo), pianist Susan Muscarella, trumpeter Ellen Seeling, sax player Jeanne Feinberg, and trombonist Sarah Cline. JazzGirls Day is held in collaboration with Jazz at Lincoln Center, and is co-sponsored by BUSD, Berkeley Jazz Parents’ Association, The Jazzschool and SF Jazz. JazzGirls Day is a free event. Rm. A201, Berkeley High, from 1-4 p.m. for the performance part, and 4-5:30 p.m. in The Little Theater for a free film screening on women and jazz (families welcome, and free popcorn promised).

Schles photoMAKING VISIBLE Photographer Ken Schles documented life in his Lower East Side neighborhood in New York for a decade, publishing the results in Invisible City in 1988. To accompany an exhibition of Schles’ work, the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism is hosting a reception, talk by Schles and book signing on Friday, Mar. 8. As the exhibition curators put it, “His camera fixed the instances of his observations, and these moments become the foundation of his invisible city.” Reception from 6 p.m., talk and signing 7-8:30 p.m., North Gate, Rm. 105, Friday. Admission is free. 

BAM aerial viewKING OF SAMPLING Electroacoustic music pioneer Carl Stone returns to the Berkeley Art Museum to perform Fujiken, which the museum describes as “ear-bending and mind-expanding.” The New York Times said Stone’s music is “a powerful stimulant with lingering euphoric effects.” Stone’s soundscapes will take advantage of the BAM’s architecture and acoustics, “enveloping the audience in sound.” Tickets are $7, and the museum suggests coming early for the best seating. Stone’s 7:30 p.m. performance will be preceded by a talk by Lauren Levin and Jennifer Manzano at 5:30 p.m. and a conversation “Surrounded by Soundscapes” with Charles Amirkhanian, Bernie Krause and Walter Murch at 6 p.m. Tickets for the L@te Friday events available on the BAM/PFA website. Doors open at 5 p.m., Friday, Mar. 8.

CanconierTHE DANCING PLAGUE Apparently, during the Middle Ages and Renaissance, some areas of Europe experienced brief outbursts of manic, contagious dancing. The five musicians who make up Cançonièr doesn’t expect that to break out in Berkeley, but is offering a program of instrumental and vocal dance music, flagellant songs, penitential prayers, tarantellas, and more. Music for the Dancing Plagues of the Middle Ages and Renaissance, 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Mar. 9, St. John’s Presbyterian Church, 2727 College Avenue. Tickets from $28 available from the San Francisco Early Music Society.

CAN YOU DIG IT? The Society for California Archaeology is hosting a free public archaeology day to learn about the diversity of California’s cultures and their past. The public day comes at the conclusion of the society’s annual meeting. There will be fun hands-on activities, displays on sites around California, volunteer information, demonstrations and more. Archaeology fans of all ages welcome. Sunday, Mar. 10, 2-5 p.m., The DoubleTree by Hilton, Berkeley Marina, 200 Marina Boulevard.

Be sure to check out these other listings previously featured on Berkeleyside:

Big Screen Berkeley: And God created Trintignant
Pulitzer Prize winner confronts his hero through Fallaci
Wonderful Town: A high energy, entertaining romp
The Black Mountain Boys, sans Jerry Garcia, ride again

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Still searching for things to do this weekend in Berkeley? Berkeleyside’s Events Calendar is chock full of music, theater, dance, talks and community happenings. We also encourage you to submit your own events. 

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  • Bill Newton

    I saw the Ken Schles exhibit at the Journalism school (just walk right in it very relaxed) at the photos were really an incredible photo record of the time and very powerful.