Xavier (Kayla) Moore’s death: The timeline

Gaia Building by Tracey Taylor

The Gaia Building at 2116 Allston Way where Xavier (Kayla) Moore lived and to which Berkeley Police were dispatched on the night of Feb. 12. Photo: Tracey Taylor

Late on Tuesday night, Feb. 12, Berkeley police responded to a dispatch call about a disturbance on Allston Way. Less than two hours later, Xavier (Kayla) Moore was pronounced dead at Alta Bates Hospital.

On Friday May 3, the Berkeley Police Department released its 348-page investigation of what happened that night, the same day that the Alameda County coroner’s report on the death was released. From the two documents, and the many sworn statements within them, it’s possible to reconstruct part of what happened that night.

Moore identified as female, using the name Kayla, but all of the police documents, the coroner’s report and the witness statements refer to Moore as a male.

Tuesday Feb. 12, 2013, around 5 or 6 p.m.

John Andre Hayes came home to apartment 514 in the Gaia Building on Allston Way early in the evening. According to Hayes, he and Moore are roommates and have known each other for 15 or more years.

In a statement to BPD Hayes said, “Xavier was high on speed and drunk. When he’s high and drunk he becomes mean and wants to fight. He asked me for money to get more speed and alcohol and I told him to go ask someone else and to leave me alone.”

Hayes apparently left the apartment at some point not detailed in the statements.

Around 10:30 or 11 p.m.

Hayes returns to the apartment with Edward Sterling, who describes himself as Moore’s caretaker.

“I was trying to make Xavier some food. Xavier’s demeanor appeared agitated and upset,” Sterling said in his sworn statement. “He was pacing around and in the middle of smoking weed and drinking alcohol. Xavier wasn’t acting like himself and I asked John if Xavier had been taking his prescription medications and John said he hadn’t for a while. When I was talking to Xavier he wasn’t making sense.

“Angel, Xavier’s girlfriend, and Xavier were arguing about meth. Xavier told Angel, ‘If you don’t have any more drugs, you can get out.’ They continued arguing and Xavier picked up a chair and threw at Angel, but it didn’t hit her. Xavier was upset because he thought that Angel had drugs and was holding out on him. Angel left and then it was just me, John and Xavier.”

According to Sterling, Moore asked Hayes to leave five minutes later, which he did.

“Xavier was acting ‘ziggity boom like a mother fucker,'” Hayes said in his statement. “That means he was acting like he does when he is really high.”

“Xavier kept pacing around and acting strange,” Sterling continued. “When he was talking to me he was out of breath and having difficulty breathing.”

11:49 p.m.

When Hayes left the apartment, he called 911 and spoke to BPD’s communications center.

Hayes said in the call that his roommate was “acting a fool” and needed to be “brought into the psych ward.” He said that Moore should be taking medication, “but hasn’t for a long time.” He told the dispatcher that he was on the lease of the apartment and had been put out for “no reason.” He said there were no weapons in the house, but that Moore had been known to pick up kitchen knives and threaten to use them. He said that Moore was diagnosed with Schizoaffective disorder.

11:54 p.m.

Radio dispatch is made on police channel for a 5150, a potential involuntary psychiatric hold.

11:57 p.m.

Officer Gwendolyn Brown arrives at the Gaia Building.

11:58 p.m.

Officers Brandon Smith and Kenneth Tu arrive. Smith asks Brown if the suspect’s name was Xavier Moore. When Brown confirms the name, Smith says he is wanted on a $10,000 warrant from San Francisco.

Hayes lets the three officers into the building and lets them into the apartment. Brown instructs Hayes to step away. She called out to Moore from the doorstep.

Sterling, who was still in the apartment, said he heard the police talking to Moore.

“At one point, Xavier was telling the officers jibberish about the government and not feeling safe,” Sterling said in his statement. “I couldn’t understand what Xavier was talking about because he wasn’t making any sense.”

Officer Brown’s account: “Moore came to the door and I questioned him as to what was going on with him and roommate Hayes. Moore was unable to answer my questions. He appeared to have difficulty focusing. Moore became increasingly angry and kept rambling something like the FBI was following him and that we were not real police officers.”

While Brown was talking to Moore, Officer Smith did a computer check on Hayes and found an outstanding $5,000 warrant. Hayes cooperated with Smith and went downstairs. Smith handcuffed him and put him in the back seat of the patrol car. (Hayes was subsequently taken to jail at 12:58 a.m.)

Upstairs, Brown “made the decision to physically restrain Moore for a 5150 evaluation and the $10,000 warrant.” She tells Moore that he would be going to the police department.

“Moore became very angry and said he was not going,” according to Brown’s statement. “He then said he was going inside to call the FBI to clear up the matter. I told him he could make the call from the station. He continued saying he would call the FBI from his apartment. I told Moore that he needed to come with us. He flat out refused. He was unresponsive to my verbal commands.

“Moore’s behavior became increasingly aggressive,” Brown continued. “I signaled to Officer Tu to go hands on and assist me in placing Moore in handcuffs. Officer Tu grabbed Moore’s left wrist. I simultaneously grabbed Moore’s right wrist, in an attempt to apply a control hold and put the handcuffs on. Moore immediately started yelling, ‘No, No!’ He attempted to pull away. Officer Tu and I maintained our grasps. Moore continue to violently pull away. While doing so, he pulled Officer Tu and me into his apartment. We all fell on a mattress that was on the floor, against the east wall.

12:29 a.m.

Brown calls for additional officers under a Code 3.

“At the same time,” she continued, “I noticed a BMA [black male adult], later identified as witness Sterling, in the apartment. For officer safety reasons, I ordered him out of the apartment. Officer Tu and I continued struggling to restrain Moore who was violently resisting. I ordered him to stop. There was no compliance.”

Sterling’s witness statement: “The scuffle started outside the doorway and then continued inside the apartment. Xavier wasn’t being cooperative with the police at all. The officers kept telling Xavier to ‘stop resisting’ but he wouldn’t. He kept resisting and speaking jibberish. Officer Brown told me to wait outside, so I left the apartment quickly and waited outside. I was worried that Xavier was going to freak out and attack me too as I was trying to get out.”

Officers Mathis, Gardner and Kastmiller arrive at the apartment. Brown and Tu had managed to get one hand cuffed, and with assistance from the other officers, are able to cuff the other wrist. Because of Moore’s size, nearly 350 pounds, two sets of cuffs were used.

After being handcuffed, according to Tu, Moore “continued to scream and kick,” so the other officers used the ankle strap of a WRAP device to secure his ankles. “Moore continued resisting for a short period of time before appearing to calm down,” Tu wrote in his statement. Once he calmed, we rolled him onto his side, and Officer Brown confirmed that he was breathing and had a pulse.”

12:39 a.m.

About a minute later, Brown said that Moore was no longer breathing and no longer had a pulse. Berkeley Fire Department is called with a Code 3. “We immediately removed the handcuffs, laid him on his back and began CPR,” Brown wrote.

12:43 a.m.

BFD’s Medic 1 arrives at the apartment and takes over efforts to revive Moore.

1:04 a.m.

BFD Engine 5/Medic 1 transports Moore to Alta Bates Hospital. They arrive at 1:10 a.m.

1:34 a.m.

Dr. Benjamin Bonnes pronounces Moore’s death.

According to the coroner, Moore died of “acute combined drug intoxication”. Morbid obesity and cardiomegaly (enlarged heart) were considered significant conditions. There was no evidence of trauma. The only evidence of injury were areas of abrasion and contusion on the wrists.

Related:
Coroner, police deliver reports on Xavier Moore death [05.03.13]
Emotional please prompt call for Kayla Moore report [04.01.13]
Police union: Should Berkeley have Tasers? [04.02.3013]
Anti-police demonstrators march in downtown Berkeley [03.13.13]
Berkeley Police release statement on in-custody death [02.28.13]
Name released after death in custody, cause unknown [02.22.13]
Man dies after struggle with Berkeley Police [02.13.13]

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  • guest

    This timeline is several years too short to account for this person’s death.

  • Mike

    From my perspective, you are asking the wrong question. One of BPD’s jobs is to arrest people who have outstanding warrants. Another of their jobs is to detain people who may be a danger to themselves or others. Perhaps the better question is, “Why was Mobile Crisis not available to help BPD in this situation?” I do not know the details of the MCT beyond what is on their website. Maybe this program needs to be expanded so that they will be available at times like these.

  • guest

    One of BPD’s jobs is to arrest people who have outstanding warrants.

    This is a red herring, though. The point is that what the police allege they were primarily, first and foremost doing was executing a 5150 hold. Even after they discovered the warrant, step one was still a 5150 hold.

    That’s appropriate. There was no life-threatening crisis until they themselves triggered one.

    How could have gone differently?

    I’ve witnessed the Mobile Crisis team assist 5150s in cases where the person was likely to (and did) violently resist. Here is an example of the pattern of how this was done safely:

    First, MCT delayed any action until the police could be joined by an EMT (an ambulance that would take the person to Highland).

    Then the police, FD, and MCT took a brief moment to formulate a plan for how to safely approach the person.

    Then they executed the plan. MCT tried in vain, briefly, to talk the person down.

    On cue, the person was forcibly restrained and MCT tried again. This time the person was more cooperative. The person was eventually medicated and carried away, strapped to a gurney.

    If similar steps had been taken in this case, EMTs would have been present at the moment Moore was first put in restraints. When Moore lost consciousness, the emergency medical response would have started immediately and by equipped EMTs rather than (initially) by police.

    As a matter of public policy, Berkeley has been cutting back on its mental health services and beefing up the police. Moore’s death looks to me like the kind of trade-off that policy is making.

  • Mike

    “The point is that what the police allege they were primarily, first and foremost doing was executing a 5150 hold.”

    You may have more information on this, but I’m not sure this is true. While officers were dispatched for a 5150, when they arrived they stated that Moore “is wanted on a $10,000 warrant from San Francisco,” while it is not stated that they mentioned the 5150. Additionally, it is stated above that Brown “made the decision to physically restrain Moore for a 5150 evaluation and the $10,000 warrant.” Thus, it seems that both the 5150 and outstanding warrants were motivating police action.

    Thanks for your account of the MCT. Indeed, it seems as though their presence could have significantly impacted this situation for the better. It seems as though it would best serve Berkeley residents if Berkeley invested more in mental health services that can work with BPD. Ideally, funding for BPD and mental health services would not be mutually exclusive. Given the crime levels in Berkeley, especially around campus, I’m not sure either has enough funding.

  • Charles_Siegel

    This is a good point, but it doesn’t respond to your own question:

    “Mobile Crisis was not available”
    So the next best thing was to use force? That’s the policy?

    You are now saying that Mobile Crisis should have been available. Fine.

    But given that Mobile Crisis was not in fact available, I don’t see how we can fault the police for their behavior.

  • guest

    Mike, this:

    Additionally, it is stated above that Brown “made the decision to
    physically restrain Moore for a 5150 evaluation and the $10,000
    warrant.” Thus, it seems that both the 5150 and outstanding warrants were motivating police action.

    I can’t speak to their motives. That quote speaks to legal authority. The warrant, alone, and as well the obvious need for a 5150, alone, both gave the police legal authority to take Moore into physically restrained custody. The use of force to get her into restraints is a separate question.

    Police initiated the use of force for a third reason: Moore’s non-compliance with their orders.

    The officer’s first-person account says that he gave orders. Moore not only refused but was deeply confused in the manner of a person having a serious crisis. This is not surprising because the police had been called to the scene for a possible 5150 in the first place.

    At that point, when it was first clear that Moore was that out of it, the police had the option to slow down, proceed more carefully, and get Moore safely to the emergency care she needed. (They did not.)

  • guest

    I don’t see how we can fault the police for their behavior.

    They initiated force when they could have waited for more support, including medical professionals.

    The account also seems to suggest that Moore lost consciousness, fully or partially, and the police did not even then call for EMTs. (They describe this as when she “calmed down” so much that they checked her pulse and rolled her on her side.)

  • Mike

    “The police had the option to slow down, proceed more carefully, and get Moore safely to the emergency care she needed. (They did not.)”

    I see your point here. However, in order to do this the police would have had to recognize that this person was in a mental health crisis that would result in a problematic situation should they use force. Having not been there, nor having read the full report, nor being a mental health expert, nor understanding how much mental training BPD officers have, I have no idea if this was a reasonable expectation of them. Regardless, it seems as though this determination would be be better made by a mental health professional. Which again brings me back to the same argument (which may not be the only one, but is the only one that I’m comfortable making, and still might be invalid): MCT should have been available and present. If they weren’t available, the fact that they were not available was not BPDs fault. Perhaps a reasonable policy change would be to have medical/mental health professionals accompany BPD on all 5150s? I wonder how much this would cost?

  • Paul Kealoha-Blake

    Mr. Sterling was free to leave any perceived danger, he remained until ordered from the room by BPD. He was not being held hostage. Regarding being arrested for an outstanding warrant. My reading of the report indicates that BPD was not called to serve a warrant, they were called to respond to a mental health crisis. Again, no weapons other than a possible kitchen knife (which most kitchens have, turning every citizen with a kitchen into a possible danger to others) no firearms, no one in danger and a closed door. The alleged incident of chair throwing was over and the participant was not present. Throughout this dialogue all I have called attention to is that mental health intervention may have saved a life. A life that then could have been served with an outstanding warrant with far less effort and expense. An outstanding warrant should not be escalated to death after being forcefully being restrained while in a possible mental health crisis. Under those circumstances it seems like a very in opportune moment to attempt to serve a warrant.
    In any case, why was there no mental health intervention? It is possible that at least one of the officers may have been CIT trained. If there was a CIT trained officer there, that officer departed from CIT procedures and policy. I saw no mention of that in the report. If we as a community must depend on mental crisis episodes occurring only during business hours, to receive professional mental health intervention, then we as a community should change that… and we can. If we want to. If we feel that no change is necessary then we should proceed with current practices. Change? or not?

  • guest

    MCT should have been available and present. If they weren’t available,
    the fact that they were not available was not BPDs fault. Perhaps a reasonable policy change would be to have medical/mental health professionals accompany BPD on all 5150s? I wonder how much this would cost?

    I agree that MCT should be better funded and should have been there.

    Even just having the EMTs there before trying to take her into custody would have made sense. In this particular case it would have cost the city less money, so far, to have done that.

    And the plan should have been straight to Highland although the officer says he told her she was going to the police station.

    The Police Review Commission will have a lot to consider from this case. I hope that among other things they will look into what incentives the officers had to finish-up with the call quickly; whether or not BPD is abusing the WRAP device; and whether Meehan’s efforts to build an enhanced in-house crisis team led to this outcome.

  • Mike

    Paul, I agree with just about all of your points. I strongly agree that as a community we need to be able to respond to mental health crises 24 hours a day and I believe that a priority needs to be placed on treating the mentally ill with fairness and compassion. I disagree with you on two key points:

    1) I thought that you were indicating that mental health professionals should have responded first, without BPD. From my point of view, it seems as though police response was warranted. I agree, however, that mental health professionals should have ALSO been present.

    2) “Again, no weapons other than a possible kitchen knife (which most kitchens have, turning every citizen with a kitchen into a possible danger to others)”

    It is true that most kitchens have knives, but I don’t think that the users of most kitchens have “threatened to use them.” I lack the context of the full report (where can I find it?), but it seems like there was some reason to believe that it was a potentially dangerous situation.

    It sounds like you have thought about this, what sort of specific change would you advocate?

  • guest

    I lack the context of the full report (where can I find it?),

    You can’t. You could try to find someone with a paper copy or ask for one yourself.

  • Charles_Siegel

    When I reading the account, it seems very clear to me that the police acted reasonably at each step, given the knowledge and resources they had. I think the overwhelming majority of readers would agree.

    You seem to expect the police to have perfect knowledge – including the ability to foresee what would happen.

  • guest

    You seem to expect the police to have perfect knowledge -

    Not at all. I expect them to show more restraint before using force, and to summon emergency medical care when someone they’ve just roughed up abruptly passes out without warning, rather than waiting until they later notice that that person has also subsequently stopped breathing.

  • Paul Kealoha-Blake

    I appreciate your clear response. Regarding what you refer to as points of disagreement, I think we are probably closer to agreement than disagreement.

    Ideally I would hope that trained and qualified mental health professionals could respond to a call on their own. However anyone who has intervened in a serious psychotic episode… sometimes complicated by drug use or lack of prescribed medication, knows that they may be faced with often complex or volatile circumstances.

    In this case as far as I can tell, a mental health professional was not present at all… not with Police, or without. I don’t know if the result of the Kayla Moore call could have been altered if they had been present, I am seeking change that would offer us a chance to find out.

    From my point of view and reading of the report I felt that the escalation of the event appeared to be rapid and led very quickly to physical contact. That contact may have been lessened by intervention from someone specifically trained to respond to a mental health crisis. One of the goals of intervention is to lessen instances in which we must burden law enforcement. It is a matter of protecting everyone from injury or worse. The BPD has publicly pointed out their long and outstanding relationship with the mental health community… that has not been my personal experience for some time now. What has happened? How can it change? I have seen mental health and law enforcement work together in the street. What has changed?

    Is it that local law enforcement has become more militarized and as such is less able to work with professional mental health intervenors? Is it that the mentally ill present a greater danger than they have in the past? Berkeley has a tendency to perceive itself as being a compassionate and cutting edge community regarding many issues… I question that perception in our current treatment of the mentally ill in our community.

    As a young homeless man recently pointed out about mental illness. “It could be you… or someone you love”

    In Kayla Moores instance, it was someone who was loved by her family, it was someone who was a part of our community.

    Regarding kitchen knives, someone felt endangered… and he left. Kayla probably said many things at that time, some threatening and some not… It is my hope that a mental health professional might have been able to lower the threat level of all parties.

    In answer to advocating, I have thought about this, but frankly I think I need more data and more interaction with both the community at large as well as the mental health community. It is possible that we already have policies and procedures inn place that are adequate… but they are not adhered to. Or perhaps what is in place needs to be redesigned and changed. It is my sincere hope that the well being of all of us can be considered regarding mental health policy and procedure in our community.

  • Charles_Siegel

    According to the article, they waited about one minute:
    “About a minute later, Brown said that Moore was no longer breathing”
    You are demanding split-second decisions based on perfect information.

  • Paul Kealoha-Blake

    Your perception is that most people including those on your Mental Health Commission are “clueless”about how these various programs are designed for abuses? What shapes that perception bgal4? Are you in disagreement with someone on the Commission? Do you have information that has concluded or confirmed that a trained mental health professional would not have been able to de-escalate the Kayla Moore call? If a Commissioner or for that matter any individual was in fact knowledgeable about the vulnerability of those programs to abuse… would that alter the results of a case like the Kayla Moore call? If so… I as a Berkeley mental health commissioner invite you to educate me more about program abuse and its impact on the well being of both the mentally ill as well as the community at large. I am in fact more familiar with hoarding than most individuals, perhaps I could have helped in your particular experience. It sounds dangerous and you are fortunate that the results were not more tragic. I have stated to you more than once that I look forward to your help and contributions. I have invited you to Commission meetings, I have included an email address and have received not a single response from you. I again submit the same interest and invitation to you.

  • Paul Kealoha-Blake

    I agree that better care may have been helpful.

  • Paul Kealoha-Blake

    It is possible that the issue includes all of the above and more.

  • bgal4

    Actually, we talked just two weeks ago in Walgreens.

  • Mike

    “If a Commissioner or for that matter any individual was in fact knowledgeable about the vulnerability of those programs to abuse… would that alter the results of a case like the Kayla Moore call?”

    I can’t speak to the vulnerability of these programs to abuse influencing the outcome of the Kayla Moore call, but isn’t it true that these programs could have been more effective in assisting Moore, and that their (apparent) failure did acutely alter the results of the Kayla Moore call (and perhaps even be the root cause of the call itself)? I realize that not everyone wants to lead a mainstream lifestyle, and that’s completely fine, but ideally these programs would have resulted in Moore taking her medication, and had not using meth, right? Regardless of the contribution of police action, can we agree the these two factors played a major role in her death? Can we speculate that maybe these programs didn’t benefit Moore (and the community) as well as they could have? Is this tragedy galvanizing an effort to also review how the assistance being rendered to Moore (and others in similar positions) could have been more effective? Shouldn’t more be done than focussing on the actions by BPD? Again, I don’t know enough to do anything but speculate. Paul, I’m sure you’ve thought about this a lot, care to share any thoughts?

  • Paul Kealoha-Blake

    Yes I recall the exchange as being cordial and being directed primarily at your characterization of the Kayla Moore case as one of “excited delirium” which I said had not yet been established. You went on further to say that we were in disagreement re: Laura’s Law. I stated at that point that I was not sure that we were in disagreement, we in fact both agreed that a change was needed, but few counties in California have at this point embraced Laura’s Law legislation and that I was looking forward to more information regarding how to proceed. Sorry about your brother and the predatory care giver. I have heard other friends over the years voice that concern, and it is not as easy to prevent as people may think.

  • bgal4

    Exactly. thx

    I would have described our brief exchange as friendly and easy going rather than cordial.

  • Paul Kealoha-Blake

    Thanks for your sincere question.. Here is a sincere response. One point that intervention might have occurred is at the point Kayla went to the door to speak to Ofcr. Brown. That is one point that intervention may have been able to begin a de-escalation of the entire event. As I state repeatedly I don’t know, and we won’t know, because there was no professional mental health intervention.

    Kayla responds (which she did) to Ofcr. Brown’s request that she step to the doorway to converse. Ofcr. Brown states that Kayla was talking about the FBI etc. probably a symptom of her schizophrenic state.

    The general tone of the entire incident is that Kayla was constantly confrontational and aggressive, however this is just one example of a point in which, though she was in a crisis episode, Kayla responded by being compliant to a request.

    It is at these moments that the door is possibly opened to techniques other than a forceful and dangerous wrestling takedown of the suspect.

    It may have taken time for a mental health professional to help Kayla de-escalate, but time is far more available in a case like this than the extinguishing of a life.

    Intervention is not a cure for Kayla Moore nor an effort to interfere with BPD, it is just another effort to safeguard all parties.

    I don’t know if intervention would have worked at that point, I don’t know if intervention would have created less risk for BPD or Kayla Moore.

    It is my hope that we can help set in place procedures that will give intervention in a mental health crisis a chance to try. We know the result of no intervention.

  • Mike

    Thanks for your thoughtful response. Reading your posts has helped my views on these issues evolve.

  • Justice 4 Kayla Moore

    Kayla never once threatened the cops before they laid hands on her. She was actively psychotic-which isn’t a crime-and inside of her residence. Instead of trying to calm Kayla, or even requesting an ambulance at the scene, Office Brown LIED. Kayla was delusional, off her meds, and on drugs. Officer Brown wanted to arrest her. She chose to grab Xavier instead of following the 5150 policy.
    When the cops came to the scene, the first thing they did was run a warrent checks on the so called “victim,.” and the person having a mental health crisis. They chose to ignore the fact they were there for a 5150 MH evaluation.
    If someone is having a mental crisis, and is acting bizarre why escalate the situation by threatening with an unconfirmed warrant?
    Page 86, paragraph 4, “Smith told Brown about the warrant but advised he was unsure if it was for Moore because of the birth year.”
    Page 87, “Records bureau operator advised of no warrant for Moore. Smith passed on the information to Brown on a field interview card.”
    Why are untrained CIT officers responding to “disturbances” that involve a person who has a history of mental illness, 5150’s and hospitalizations in Berkeley-all within the last 6 months? If BPD can only provide mobile crisis during working hours, then they have a responsibility to demand that all their officers be CIT trained.
    It’s easy to dismiss this as a “junkie” acting out of control. Mental health and drug use go hand in hand. I urge you to read the WHOLE report and your opinion on that night will change.

    The police were responding to a “disturbance.” The caller informed them Xavier had been off his meds, using drugs, acting bizarre and needed to be 5150’d. Why wasn’t an ambulance called by Officer Brown once she observed his “bizarre” behavior?
    No protocol was followed because BDP doesn’t have one

  • PragmaticProgressive

    It’s easy to dismiss this as a “junkie” acting out of control. Mental health and drug use go hand in hand.

    No, they do not. Lots and lots of people receive mental health care without abusing illegal drugs.

  • F*** Anarchists

    Occupy Oakland foments violence RE: Kayla Moore

    http://tranifesto.tumblr.com/post/45138045772#notes

  • guest

    Here is a list of all of the violence that occurred at that protest:

  • Berkeley Boy

    “At one point, Xavier was telling the officers jibberish about the government and not feeling safe,” Sterling said in his statement. “I couldn’t understand what Xavier was talking about because he wasn’t making any sense.”
    That’s how most of my Berkeley neighbors talk.

  • Anonymous

    Xavier “Kkayla” Moore was not a bad person just did stood things and the drugs made this person sick mentally the body can only handle so much. I met this person one-time in person. They would also call people delusional and talking about celebrities coming by their house. Back in I believe `06 they were held for 320 something days for attempted murder. The only reason that the charge never held up was that the victim disappeared for worry if repercussions if they were not found guilty and also just wanting to personally move forward in they’re life people that knew this person should have gotten them help along time before they are in a better place and from what I know of this after they hit released from jail they were not the same. If that does not convince you the cost drugs have on you there was an incident with Kaylas best friend in July `99 where they went at that person over not loaning then $2 with a hammer and ended up hitting somebody who pushed the person out off the way.