Berkeley school employees demonstrate for new contract

Berkeley Council of Classified Employees demonstrated on Friday March 28, 2014 outside BUSD’s HQ on Bonar Street. Photo: Ted Friedman

Around 100 Berkeley Unified School District employees — including instructional assistants, school secretaries, custodians, bus drivers, and some of their children — held a rally and demonstrated on the afternoon of Friday March 28 in front of BUSD’s headquarters at 2020 Bonar St.

The demonstrators, members the Berkeley Council of Classified Employees (BCCE) which represents 570 classified employees within Berkeley Unified, said that their top concerns were income inequality, affordable health care, and a stable learning environment.

Photo: Ted Friedman

Photo: Ted Friedman

In a prepared statement the union wrote: “For the past three years, Local 6192 has tried to negotiate a new contract with the district and has been working under the old one ever since.”

BCCE President Paula Phillips said, “We have members who pay over 30% of their paychecks towards medical benefits, and the district wants to give raises to management without lifting up the bottom, too. We are here to say that Berkeley can and should do better for the sake of our members, our schools, and our community.”

Berkeley Council of Classified Employees demonstrated on Friday March 28, 2014 outside BUSD's HQ on Bonar Street. Photo: Ted Friedman

Photo: Ted Friedman

Ted Friedman who took the photos here, said the demo was “spirited,” and that many cars driving by honked their horns to show solidarity.

Last week Berkeley Unified announced that it had reached a tentative agreement on a 2013-2015 contract with the Berkeley Federation of Teachers.

Berkeley Council of Classified Employees demonstrated on Friday March 28, 2014 outside BUSD's HQ on Bonar Street. Photo: Ted Friedman

Photo: Ted Friedman

Berkeley Council of Classified Employees demonstrated on Friday March 28, 2014 outside BUSD's HQ on Bonar Street. Photo: Ted Friedman

Photo: Ted Friedman

Related:
Berkeley teachers, district reach tentative contract agreement (03.26.14) 
Berkeley teachers, district agree on 2.5% wage increase (05.31.13)
Berkeley teachers’ bonus plan rebuffed by district (03.07.13)
Portraits: Berkeley school gardening and cooking educators (05.29.13)
Berkeley appoints Donald Evans as new Schools Superintendent (05.22.13)

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  • sustaintheBASP

    The mission of a public school district is to educate the schoolchildren who reside within that district. It is not to maximize funding, maximize staffing, synthesize/manufacture diversity not found in the residential population, or siphon off resources from neighboring communities in an effort to “save” children from attending school where they live.

    Berkeley residents choose private alternatives to public school in large numbers because, in part, there is a disconnect between district objectives and the needs of the community. Narrow that gap and residents who are not being served will return.

    As students from, say, Oakland return to OUSD, there will be more $$ for those districts to meet their needs. If they don’t want to go, their families can do what millions of people do around the country: move and enroll lawfully.

  • guest

    Did someone find some evidence that “enrollment fraud”is a problem at BUSD? That would be a novelty.

  • guest

    ATTENDING TO THE BOTTOM LINE:
    Boosting District Revenue and Enhancing Educational Mission
    Through Interdistrict Enrollment & Attendance Policy
    An Advanced Policy Analysis Prepared for
    the Berkeley Unified School District,
    Berkeley, California
    By Rinat Fried
    Spring 2005
    The
    author conducted this study as part of the program of professional
    education at the Goldman School of Public Policy, University of
    California at Berkeley. This paper is submitted in partial fulfillment
    of the course requirements for the Master of Public Policy degree. The
    judgements and conclusions are solely those of the author, and are not
    necessarily endorsed by the Goldman School of Public Policy, by the
    University of California or by any other agency.

    https://anonfiles.com/file/edba88cce0a74cd8b9c7dbf7df78728f

  • guest

    It doesn’t matter how many departments BHS has, black students in Berkeley schools are doing terribly on testing.

    http://www.berkeleyside.com/2012/03/22/berkeley-highs-long-decline-in-math-english-proficiency/