Opponents reach compromise on Berkeley minimum wage ballot language

Mayoral candidates Laurie Capitelli and Jesse Arreguín butted heads Tuesday night over the minimum wage proposal. Photos: Mark Coplan
Mayoral candidates Laurie Capitelli and Jesse Arreguín: proponents for different ballot measures. Photos: Mark Coplan

The two sides that placed two different ballot measures regarding the minimum wage on the November ballot reached an agreement in court Thursday that will result in a strange-looking voter information pamphlet.

The supporters of Measure BB, which would have raised the minimum wage to $15 by 2019, and the supporters of Measure CC, which would have raised it to $15 by 2017, have agreed to eliminate their arguments in favor of their respective measures from the ballot. The “Argument in Favor of Measure BB” and the “Argument in Favor of Measure CC’ will now be blank. Both sides will also place identical rebuttals to the measures in the voter information pamphlet, according to City Councilman Laurie Capitelli.

The changes were requested – and accepted by a judge – because the City Council approved a compromise measure that went into effect Aug. 31, raising the minimum wage to $15 by 2018. The new law has made the competing ballot measures moot.

Both sides have also agreed to run a campaign against Measure BB and Measure CC, said Capitelli.


“We need to make the case clearly that a consensus was arrived at,” he said.

Capitelli had brought a writ of mandate against Berkeley and the backers of Measure CC, which included Assemblyman Tony Thurmond, because it included a line saying he had been swayed by business interests. That language was removed from the ballot.

Stay tuned to Berkeleyside for more 2016 election coverage.

Related:
Courts weigh in on two of Berkeley’s ballot measures (08.31.16)
Council passes minimum wage law for $15 in 2018 (08.26.16)

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