Quirky Berkeley: Eni Green’s Harper Street Doxie temple

3026 Harper Street. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper St. Photo: John Storey

The large Doggie Diner head peeking over the driveway gate is the largest piece of dachshund art in Eni Green’s Harper Street front yard. Doxie lovers — this is for you. Quirk lovers — this is for you.

Eni Green. Photo: John Storey
Eni Green. Photo: John Storey

Green has loved dachshunds since she got her first when she was 16, Mitzala. Green is a collector. It started innocently. Her Ithaca College Spanish professor, Eduardo de Aguero, gave her a painting he had made. She started collecting, and soon her love of dachshunds met her love of collecting.

Her front yard is filled with large dachshund sculptures.

3026 Harper Street. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper St. Photo: John Storey

This piece over the driveway was commissioned from Mark Bulwinkle. His initials (MB) appear on the dog’s hat where you would expect to see DD.


3026 Harper Street. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper St. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper Street. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper St. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper Street. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper St. Photo: John Storey

Several pieces by “junk artist” Patrick Amiot of Sebastapol celebrate the dachshund. In 2016, Green commissioned a dachshund Little Free Library.

3026 Harper Street. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper St. Photo: John Storey

It is one of the finest rogue little free library designs around town.

Inside her home, the dachshund art doesn’t stop.

3026 Harper Street. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper St. Photo: John Storey

Paintings cover all walls of her home. Also: her mother’s miniature porcelain shoe collection, hundreds of Raggedy Ann and Raggedy Andy dolls, Buster Brown, Nipper the RCA Victor dog, and pre-Cuisinart food choppers. And a carousel horse and a telephone booth. And more.

Nipper, 3026 Harper Street. Photo: John Storey
Nipper, 3026 Harper St. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper Street. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper St. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper Street. Photo: John Storey
3026 Harper St. Photo: John Storey

Tom Dalzell, a labor lawyer, created a website, Quirky Berkeley, to share all the whimsical objects he has captured with his iPhone. The site now has more than 8,000 photographs of quirky objects around town as well as posts where the 30-plus-year resident muses on what it all means.


For a fuller version of this post, see Quirky Berkeley.

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