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Articles by John

Page 2
  • Big Screen Berkeley: ‘The Handmaiden’, ‘Company Town’

    If you’re familiar with South Korean filmmaker Chan-Woo Park you know his reputation. The creator of such outrageous, over-the-top features as Lady Vengeance and Oldboy (remade by Spike Lee in 2013), Park specializes in pushing the cinematic envelope and making audiences uncomfortable.

  • Big Screen Berkeley: ‘The Battle of Algiers,’ Do Not Resist’

    I first saw Gillo Pontecorvo’s 1965 feature La Battaglia di Algeri (The Battle of Algiers) at Berkeley’s UC Theatre sometime in the mid 1980s. To say it was an eye opener would be an understatement: here was a ‘war movie’ that told its story from the perspectives of both sides. Who was I supposed to root for?

  • Big Screen Berkeley: ‘Command and Control’; ‘Girl Asleep’

    If you’ve yet to read Eric Schlossel’s 2014 book Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety, allow me to proffer a strong recommendation — but be warned. If you’re at all nervous about the possibilities of a nuclear apocalypse, it won’t put your mind at rest or help you sleep at night.

  • Big Screen Berkeley: ‘Birth of a Nation’

    In the days and weeks ahead you’ll probably be reading a great deal about Birth of a Nation. No, we haven’t travelled back in time to 1915 (that will have to wait until after President Trump’s inauguration) – this Birth of a Nation (opening at Landmark’s California Theatre on Friday, Oct. 7) is entirely unrelated, though it’s also likely to provoke controversy.

  • Big Screen Berkeley: ‘Demon’

    Before the Second World War, heavily Catholic Poland was also home to most of the world’s Jewish population. That changed, of course, during the war, when at least 90% of Poland’s 3 million Jews were killed by the Nazi extermination machine, leaving only a few thousand survivors behind.

  • Big Screen Berkeley: ‘Author — The J.T. LeRoy Story’

    I vaguely remember bits and pieces of the J. T. LeRoy saga. Around the turn of the 21st century, LeRoy was an author of great repute and considerable mystery: he (or was it a she?) was actually a she (or was it a he?). Whatever the case, it was a great opportunity to get into some serious pronoun trouble.

  • Big Screen Berkeley: ‘In Order of Disappearance’

    During Hollywood’s Golden Age, most major features were produced within the studio system. When you went to the theatre you could expect your show to be prefaced by such familiar logos as the Fox searchlights, the MGM lion, the Paramount peak, the Warner Brothers shield, or (if you weren’t downtown that day) perhaps the RKO radio tower or Columbia statue.

  • Big Screen Berkeley: ‘The People versus Fritz Bauer’

    First, let’s get my minor complaint out of the way: the marketing for The People versus Fritz Bauer (Der Staat gegen Fritz Bauer, opening at Landmark’s Opera Plaza Cinema on Friday, Aug. 26 – no East Bay play dates are currently scheduled) leaves something to be desired. Specifically, a more accurate translation of the film’s original title would be ‘The State Against Fritz Bauer’, which is a far more accurate representation of its content.

  • Big Screen Berkeley: ‘Phantom Boy’

    Like many adults, I really enjoy a good children’s film. Now that my nest is thoroughly empty, however, I have far fewer opportunities (or imperatives!) to scope them out.

  • Big Screen Berkeley: ‘Captain Fantastic’; ‘Breaking a Monster’

    Three-quarters of the way into Captain Fantastic (opening at Landmark’s California Theater on Friday, July 22), I thought I might be watching one of 2016’s Best Picture Academy Award nominees. One implausible plot development later, I wasn’t so sure — but I am convinced that Viggo Mortensen is likely to receive Oscar recognition for his lead role in this frequently excellent (if periodically absurd) new feature.

  • Big Screen Berkeley: ‘Microbe and Gasoline’

    Generally, things are just a little bit off-kilter in the world of Michel Gondry. From Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind to Be Kind Rewind (and with the notable exception of his 2012 feature, the comparatively neo-realistic The We and the I), the French filmmaker has displayed a penchant for telling stories with a slightly surreal bent.