Recent Stories

  • Berkeley Fire Dept reports ammonia leak at Bayer lab

    Update, 8:40 p.m.: BFD and BPD issued a Nixle alert around 7 p.m. saying that the incident at Bayer was over. “All ammonia readings back to zero,” it states. “No release to atmosphere. Property back under Bayer control. Incident terminated at approximately 6:30 p.m. No report on cause at this time.”

  • Shop Talk: BodyRok Studio; Maxi Hair Salon; Oh Shirt Yeah

    BODYROK STUDIOS Berkeley is getting fit in all kinds of ways with new gyms and clubs popping up all over town, as Berkeleyside reported in September. Open since late May, BodyRok is in full swing in West Berkeley at 1601 University Ave. (at California). “We are the first franchise location for BodyRok and the first studio in the East Bay,” said owner Caroline Johnson. “Berkeley is the perfect place to introduce ourselves and focus on building a tight-knit community focused on health and fitness.” According to its website, BodyRok offers “high intensity, low impact workouts that will tone, sculpt and redefine your body and mind in just 40-50 minutes. Bring on the heart-pumping music, high-energy instructors, beautiful studios, and your muscles will be pushed to the limit.” With an emphasis on cross-training, the studio is getting rave reviews on “Yelp” and encourages members to sign up in advance or add your name to wait listed classes. BodyRok Studios, 1601 University Ave., Berkeley 94703. Tel: 510-900 9234. Open weekdays, 6 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. (select days) and 4:30-8 p.m. Mon.-Thurs., weekends from 7:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Connect with them on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. (more…)

  • Storyteller Joel ben Izzy has new book on Hanukkah (or Channukah or Chhhanukah or Chanaykayah)

    Joel ben Izzy has been regaling audiences around the globe for years with his delightful stories, many with a Jewish twist. A graduate of Stanford University and a long-time Berkeley resident, ben Izzy brings humor and pathos to the tales he spins. He has performed and led workshops in 35 countries (he is also a story consultant, helping companies and organizations better tell their own stories), and his six recorded story collections have garnered numerous awards.

  • Shop Talk: Jeremy’s, Utrecht, Patelco, Hannah’s

    JEREMY’S DEPARTMENT STORE Jeremy’s in the Elmwood is no more. The discounted designer apparel store had been at its 2967 College Ave. (at Ashby) location since the 1990s and closed for good on Nov. 20. According to a farewell letter that was posted on the store’s website, Jeremy’s did not have financial difficulties and was in profit when it shuttered. Owner Jeremy Kidson opened the first Jeremy’s store in 1987 in San Francisco’s South Park. He closed that store last year and made plans to consolidate both the SF and Berkeley stores into a converted church after buying the First Church of Christ Scientist at 1701 Franklin St. in Uptown Oakland. But, according to the East Bay Times, Kidson hit several roadblocks while trying to develop the space for retail, including permit delays, and he ran out of steam on the project. Kidson said: “From here, I will work on establishing a foundation to help kids from underprivileged backgrounds and continue my never-ending pursuit to help the underdog, along with some other ideas I have. I will still be finishing the Franklin building to serve as my home base and maybe even open a little café.” No news yet on new tenants for the vacated space on College and Ashby. (more…)

  • Berkeley clothing company Harvest & Mill has a mantra: ‘You are what you wear’

    We all know the phrase, “you are what you eat” and we certainly take that seriously in the Bay Area where the heart of local, sustainable and organic practices beats fervently and strong. But what about extending that ethos to the clothing industry, with the same level of commitment? Harvest & Mill, a clothing company with a design studio based in Berkeley — and sewing mills in Berkeley, Oakland and San Francisco — does just that by providing a product that is organic, locally grown and manufactured using sustainable practices from seed to seams.