Tag Archives: Berkeley farmers market

The farmers’ market moves to Lorin district

Shoppers at the Tuesday Farmers' Market. Photo: Nancy Rubin
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The Tuesday Berkeley Farmers’ Market moved to its new location at Adeline and 63rd Street in the Lorin District yesterday and the new spot drew the market’s biggest crowd of the year, according to Ben Feldman, the market manager for the Ecology Center.

While 2,000 to 2,500 people generally come to the Tuesday market during the summer months, hourly counts on July 10 indicated that numbers were higher than that, he said. And the crowd appeared more ethnically diverse, too.

“Our customer counts indicated that this was the busiest market all year,” said Feldman. “It certainly seemed that our turnout for the market yesterday was a more diverse crowd. We had a lot of new faces that our vendors didn’t recognize. We had a lot of our old standbys, too, like people from restaurants.”  … Continue reading »

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Berkeley Tuesday farmers’ market moving to Lorin District

Berkeley's Tuesday farmers' market in its current Derby Street location. Photos: Courtesy Ecology Center
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Some say change is as good as a holiday. Others counter that most resist change. But here’s what everyone can agree on: change comes, regardless.

And so it is that the Ecology Center’s Farmers’ Market on Tuesdays is set to move to a new location. The first formalized farmers’ market in the city, which has called Derby Street at MLK Way in South Berkeley home for 25 years, is slated to relocate come July 10 to the parking bay at Adeline and 63rd Streets in the Lorin District. The market will run, as it does now, from 2:00 p.m. to 7:00 6:30 p.m. (It’s a half hour earlier, to accommodate a church service on the site.)

The Ecology Center views the switch to a new spot in South Berkeley as part of an overall plan to increase access to farm-fresh food to areas that lack a major grocery store, though the shift also comes because the Berkeley Unified School District will be converting the adjacent playing field at the markets’ current location into a regulation-size baseball field. … Continue reading »

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Farmers’ market favorite Phoenix Pastificio

Mike Detar hawks Phoenix products -- and serves up recipe suggestions -- at the market.
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It’s one thing to run a successful food business. But to have two edible start-ups do well, even in a food-friendly town, is quite an accomplishment in an industry known for slim profits and fickle customers.

That’s the case for couple Eric and Carole Sartenaer, who started off with a little bakery in Kensington called Semifreddi’s — ring any bells? — sold that for a tidy sum three years later, then departed to Oregon for seven years to run their own bakery before returning to the Bay Area in 1993.

Eric worked for Fat Apple’s in El Cerrito for two years, but he was eager to start another food business. So, in 1995, he set up shop, and later a restaurant, on Shattuck Avenue turning out fresh pasta at The Phoenix Pastifico. The company also makes a line of baked goods — cookies, macaroons, and biscotti  — as well as its signature olive bread and pasta sauces. … Continue reading »

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Baker’s dozen: To Berkeley from a brick oven in Marin

Eduardo Morell mans the oven at the Headlands Center for the Arts in Marin. Photos: Eric Smith
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As commutes go, Eduardo Morell knows he’s onto a good thing. The south-west Berkeley dweller spends 35 minutes behind the wheel before he reaches the bucolic setting that is home to the Headlands Center for the Arts near Sausalito, in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. He’s greeted by fresh air, windswept hills, blue (or fog-filled) skies, the sound and smell of the ocean, and the seasons on display.

It is, without doubt, a special spot. That Morell gets to call it his workplace only makes it more magical.

The baker behind Morell’s Bread spends two 14- to 16-hour days at this artists’ enclave in a collection of former army barracks in the Marin Headlands, where he bakes naturally leavened bread in a wood-burning brick oven designed by master-builder Alan Scott. His loaves are served up to the artists-in-residence and sold at the Thursday and Saturday farmers’ markets in Berkeley. … Continue reading »

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Bill Fujimoto reports from the Berkeley Farmers’ Market

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Bill Fujimoto, the former manager of Berkeley’s Monterey Market, recently took a stroll through the Derby Street Berkeley Farmers Market with Bob Klein, owner of Oliveto restaurant. Klein had his video camera in hand to shoot some footage for the Oliveto Community Journal.

Fujimoto, a produce expert who left Monterey Market in 2009 and is now at Diablo Foods in Lafayette, chatted to farmers about the fruit and vegetables coming to market. He spoke with farmers from Full Belly Farm, Riverdog and Lucero. The report is one in an ocasional series created by Klein where he talks to the producers and farmers supplying his restaurant, often with his friend Fujimoto in tow. … Continue reading »

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The Fifth Quarter Charcuterie to debut at farmers’ market

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Scott Brennan, former head butcher at Berkeley’s Café Rouge, is to debut his new charcuterie shop, The Fifth Quarter, at Kensington Farmers’ Market on July 24.

“I am very excited, as you can imagine, and am hoping for a nice, warm day!” said Brennan who will be applying to Berkeley’s Saturday Farmers’ Market next.

Brennan signed a lease on a kitchen in Emeryville in June and has been working there ever since perfecting his offerings, curing some … Continue reading »

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Jam maker turns hobby into thriving local business

Dafna Kory at Local 123 Cafe./Photo: Sarah Henry
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Dafna Kory discovered the delights of jalapeňo jam during pre-dinner nibbles at a Thanksgiving gathering. She went out to buy a jar, couldn’t find the mighty spicy condiment anywhere, so she began experimenting with making her own. It became an instant hit among her posse.

At first, the self-taught preserver thought her D.I.Y. hobby would just make nice gifts for friends and family. The she moved from San Francisco to South Berkeley, saw the abundance of plums, apples, and lemons growing in her new backyard, and a jamming business was born.

Kory foraged fruit in a hyper-local fashion. She made batches of jam in her home kitchen. She personally delivered by bike. Demand for her jams grew by word-of-mouth.

Friends who had friends who owned stores began encouraging her to branch out beyond her inner circle. So she started shopping INNA jam (the name is, indeed, a playful pun) to places like Local 123, Summer Kitchen, Rick and Ann’s Restaurant and The Gardener.

About a year ago, with orders coming in a steady stream, it became clear that Kory, now 28, needed to either gear up and focus on turning her after-hours pastime into a fully fledged business or scale back and remain a hobbyist. She decided to take the plunge.

A freelance commercial video editor, Kory hasn’t looked back. She began working in a commercial kitchen in North Berkeley, selling her pickles and preserves at events like ForageSF’s Underground Market and the Eat Real Festival, and offering workshops for other D.I.Y.ers.

The UC Berkeley graduate now spends nine months of the year working full-time on her budding food business, and supplements her income in the winter months with editing gigs.

In a year, she hopes to devote 100% of her work day to INNA jam. Kory also pickles though that product line is on hiatus while she ratchets up production to meet demand for her increasingly popular jams. She delivers locally by bike, ships interstate, and offers an annual, seasonal subscription (a 10-ounce jar retails for $12). … Continue reading »

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June Taylor’s way with fruit: esoteric, steeped in history

Meyer lemons destined for a June Taylor marmalade./Photo: Sarah Henry
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June Taylor crafts the kind of conserves and fruit confections that make food writers swoon.

Case in point: Amanda Hesser’s description of Taylor’s preserves. “They are unlike any commercial preserves, not simply because she uses esoteric — virtually all organic — fruits like bergamots, kadota figs, and Santa Rosa plums, but also because she cooks them in such a way that underlines their essence,” wrote Hesser in a New York Times Magazine piece. “Sugar is used not as a crutch but a tool. Her silver-lime-and-ginger marmalade has a sting to it; her grapefruit-and-Meyer-lemon marmalade is bright, concentrated and vigorously bitter.”

Don’t just take a food scribe’s word for it. My son is partial to Taylor’s candied peels — Rangpur Lime, Oro Blanco grapefruit, and Citron — popped into porridge (oatmeal), granola, or directly in the mouth for a bittersweet treat. … Continue reading »

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John Scharffenberger: From chocolate and wine to tofu

John Scharffenberger/Photo: Anne Hamersky
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Long known for the success of his premium wine and chocolate companies, John Scharffenberger is making a name for himself these days as a tofu hawker.

In June, Scharffenberger, 59, who divides his time between a home in North Berkeley and a place in the country, signed on as the CEO of the Hodo Soy Beanery in Oakland, an artisan food factory that makes products from organic, non-GMO soybeans.

The company, whose founder Minh Tsai was previously profiled here, makes fresh tofu, yuba (tofu skins), and soymilk, as well as prepared dishes such as spicy braised tofu salad, poached yuba loaf, and soy omelette. … Continue reading »

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Doctor’s orders: Eat your greens says Preston Maring

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Here’s a notion that hardly seems radical: longtime Berkeley resident Dr. Preston Maring thinks physicians should prescribe healthy eating along with dispensing drugs to their patients.

Maring, Associate Physician-in-Chief at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Oakland, believes doctors should also walk the walk about the preventive health benefits of sound nutrition.

He’s so committed to the good food cause he’s willing to show other medical professionals how to mince garlic and whip up vinaigrette from scratch for … Continue reading »

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Nosh

Cheating Farmers’ Market vendors in the spotlight

Farmers' Market produce should be in season and not have stickers
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The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) is holding a “Farmers Market Listening Session” this evening, 5.30-7.30pm in Berkeley, after an exposé by NBC LA found vendors at Southern California farmers’ markets re-selling produce that they had not grown themselves.

This is one of several listening sessions being held across the state and is not the result of any similar findings at the Berkeley Farmers’ Markets, said Martin Bourque, Executive Director of the Ecology Center which operates three … Continue reading »

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Berkeley Bites: Aaron Betesh, Blue Heron Farms

Cooking up kale.
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For 10 years, Blue Heron Farms vendor Aaron Betesh has been selling organic vegetables to customers at all three Berkeley Farmers’ Markets.

Betesh is part of the Blue Heron crew which, for much of the year, hawks salad greens, Asian greens, herbs and flower — along with carrots, kale, and broccoli.

The produce comes from a small family farm in Corralitos, near Watsonville, run by Lori Perry and Dennis Tamura.

Farmers’ Market customers don’t always realize that not … Continue reading »

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Events

Beer Olympics, the organic way

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I don’t usually associate farmers’ markets and beer contests, but that unlikely pairing will be featured at Civic Center Park tomorrow afternoon.

The Green Beer Olympics will be held during the Saturday Berkeley Farmers’ Market. The contest consists of three events: keg toss, hop sack race, and arm wrestling (by weight class). Entry is $10 and there are separate men’s and women’s competitions.

According to Daniel Del Grande, owner and brewer of Bison Brewing, tomorrow’s event is the fourth … Continue reading »

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