Tag Archives: Berkeley School for the Deaf and Blind

Storytelling forum tells of Berkeley’s legacy for the blind

Over 50 blind and sighted people attended the storytelling event Saturday night at the East Bay Center for the Blind.  Photo: Seung Y. Lee
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For Judy Wilkinson, her story as a UC Berkeley student in the 1960s was the story of T22.

T22 was a campus building for blind students near Cal’s Doe Library. As a student, Wilkinson spent many nights in T22, long past her co-op’s curfew, listening to books on its recorders. She would wake up in the classroom and grab breakfast in the building next door.

Torn down decades ago, T22 was once the epicenter of blind student activity on campus. Wilkinson forged lifelong friendships, and paved her career as an editor for a publication of the California Council of the Blind, in the hallways of T22.

“I am who I am largely because of the politics I learned and the friends I made there,” Wilkinson said. “It was our little world. Nobody knew we were there.”

Dozens of blind residents from Berkeley and nearby, including Wilkinson, gathered to share and listen to life stories Saturday night at the East Bay Center for the Blind, at 2928 Adeline St. in South Berkeley. … Continue reading »

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A latchkey kid roams Berkeley ghost town full of promise

Clark Kerr 1
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By Greg Fuson

Nostalgia, like politics and real estate, is local.

Which helps explain how a 40-something man returns to the Berkeley California School for the Deaf and Blind (Clark Kerr Campus, as you know it today) and becomes the 11-year-old boy of his childhood.

I spent the better part of two years at that school, daydreaming in its classrooms, kicking a football across its playing fields, climbing its rooftops when adventure or mischief (or both) swelled up in me, but mostly just wandering its hallways in idle search of who knows what.

I confess: I broke some things. Windows. Drywall. Light fixtures. Toilet paper dispensers.

No teachers ever told me to stop. How could they?

The place was abandoned. … Continue reading »

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