Op-ed: How does Berkeley decide which streets to fix?

The new permeable pavers project on Allston Way allows rainwater to be absorbed into the ground instead of running into gutters and out into the bay. The demonstration project cost about $1.3 million. Berkeley's Street Audit helps the city determine which streets to repair. Photo: Larry Henry
The new permeable pavers on Allston Way allow rainwater to be absorbed into the ground instead of running into gutters and out into the bay. The demonstration project cost about $1.3 million. Berkeley’s Street Audit helps the city determine which streets to repair. Photo: Larry Henry

Many people in Berkeley wonder how the city decides which streets to repair. Why is this street full of potholes untouched, while that street over there that feels pretty smooth gets a fresh coat of slurry?

In an Opinionator piece published on Berkeleyside, Berkeley City Auditor Ann-Marie Hogan explains how her office’s 2011 Streets Audit has helped the city decide which streets to repair first, a program that has the potential to save millions of dollars.

“It turns out the city needs to time its maintenance of a street in good condition to just before the street needs more expensive repairs, and to time its repair of a street in poor condition to just before the street fails and needs total reconstruction,” she writes.

Read Hogan’s piece in the Opinonator section and share your thoughts in the comments section there.


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