Opinion: Berkeley NAACP comes out to support Councilman Ben Bartlett

The organization is also announcing a Sept. 22 community event focused on the effects of implicit bias and intergenerational trauma on people of color.

The Berkeley NAACP wants to go on record as supporting Councilman Ben Bartlett. We believe Ben has worked tirelessly to support residents in the city of Berkeley during his tenure as a council member. We are impressed with his advocacy and support for marginalized populations in Berkeley.

Councilman Bartlett has admitted to making mistakes related to his recent traffic stop. He has made a profound public apology to the entire city of Berkeley. Additionally, in the words of “several” attorneys, he did not commit a crime. In this instance surrounding the traffic stop in question, we believe that Ben used bad judgment; however, we will continue to work with him on community initiatives that are important to the Berkeley NAACP, residents in District 3 and the city of Berkeley generally.

Ben Bartlett has brought fresh ideas and offered innovative suggestions to problems that affect local communities and the city of Berkeley. His willingness to examine issues and listen to the concerns of residents, even when their viewpoints differ, allows for open dialogue. He has also made some tough choices in his political role.

Councilman Bartlett was instrumental in drafting and passing legislation regarding Paid Family Leave, decriminalization of city fines and fees, funding for police body cameras for BPD, and advocating for the creation of an African American Holistic Resource Center in South Berkeley.

We look forward to our continued working partnership with Ben Bartlett in addressing inequities, disparities and other concerns that affect people of color and other marginalized groups in Berkeley.

We want to take this opportunity to invite members of the Berkeley community to join the Berkeley NAACP and other community partners at our upcoming community forum. Please see the information below.

COMMUNITY FORUM

Understanding Implicit Bias and Historical & Intergenerational Trauma

“The Profiling of Black and Brown Bodies”

The Berkeley NAACP; the African American Steering Committee for Health and Wellness and the African American/Black Professionals & Community Network are pleased to announce a community forum that will focus on the effects of Implicit Bias and Historical & Intergenerational Trauma on People of Color and the trauma response to profiling.

SAVE THE DATE

Saturday, Sept. 22, 1-4 p.m.

Location TBD

All are welcome: People outside of the Black Community are encouraged to attend this informative session.

Mansour Id-Deen is president of the Berkeley NAACP.