The Sit List: 5 ways to fight for social justice and more

Stand in solidarity with the Asian community; remember the Holocaust; view a mural honoring South Berkeley; join a LGBT+ book club; and join a five-parks scavenger hunt.

Photo: Bethanie Hines Photography

This week, witness the Berkeley community’s commitment to social justice and more.

PULP FICTION For those of you who’ve found solace throughout the pandemic in literature and book clubs, be sure to check out the Berkeley and Portland LGBT+ Book Club, hosted by Berkeley Public Library. The book club includes works in many different genres that prominently feature queer characters and themes. For the April session, Robin C., an activist and educator in the LGBT+ community, will be giving a presentation on lesbian pulp fiction titled, “My Life in the Pulps!” The required reading for this meeting is The Price of Salt (or Carol) by Patricia Highsmith and optional readings include any works in the anthology Lesbian Pulp Fiction. Be captivated, entertained, and educated by this month’s presentation and books. Saturday, April 3. 11 a.m.- 1 p.m. Zoom. 

SCAVENGER HUNT For Easter weekend, what’s better than a scavenger hunt for the whole family? This Saturday, kids ages 3-8 can participate in a scavenger hunt across five different parks in Berkeley: George Florence Park, Becky Temko Park, Strawberry Creek Park, James Kenney Park, and San Pablo Park. At each park, staff will safely greet families with a set of instructions. If you successfully complete the hunt in each park and get your passport stamped along the way, you will receive a special spring prize. The prizes will be distributed at James Kenney Park or San Pablo Park, so make sure you complete your journey at one of those locations. Bike or walk between each hunt for an active and fun day at the parks. No registration is required. Free. Saturday, April 3. 10:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

ASIAN SOLIDARITY As a result of the rise in hate crimes against Asians, culminating in the racially-motivated mass shootings in Georgia last month, Asian American activists are facilitating dialogues and putting together action plans to protect our community and encourage solidarity. In “A Year of Asian Hate: Where Do We Go From Here?,” leaders from the Asian American community will talk about factors that have contributed to the surge in attacks against Asian Americans and tangible ways to create immediate and long-term safety for the community. The event is sponsored by the Asian American Federation and the Migrant Center, and will feature talks by leaders, victims of anti-Asian attacks, scholars, and social justice professionals. Join in the fight to stop Asian hate. Tuesday, April 6. 4 p.m. Free.

HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE Given the continued rise of anti-semitic attacks and rhetoric, it is crucial to keep the memory of the Holocaust alive. In the City of Berkeley’s 18th annual Holocaust Remembrance Day, the community will honor Edith Levy Heine, a Holocaust Survivor. The program will include performances by poet Terry Taplin and musicians Cookie Segelstein on the violin, Josh Horowitz on the accordion, and Mike Perlmutter on the clarinet, along with members of the Saul Goodman Klezmer Band. The program will also include a candle lighting ceremony and memories shared by Sasha Clancy McQueen, the grandchild of a Survivor. We can only move forward by remembering the past. Thursday, April 8 at 2 p.m. Free. 


A new mural at the East Bay Community Law Center on Adeline Street reads Know Justice Know Peace
The new mural at the East Bay Community Law Center on Adeline Street. Photo: Bethanie Hines Photography

KNOW JUSTICE Public art can be a powerful expression of the values of our community. Last week, the East Bay Community Law Center (EBCLC) unveiled a large-scale permanent art installation painted by Anavictoria Avila at their South Berkeley location at 2921 Adeline St. The two-part mural is anchored by a painted garage door that says “Know Justice, Know Peace,” surrounded by Marigold flowers. The work also includes images of an intergenerational Black family playing music and a Black woman holding a Trans Pride flag. The EBCLC writes that the mural, titled Know Justice, Know Peace—Our Vision for Community Health, “honors the lives, strength, and stories of women of color, and commemorates the power and vibrancy of EBCLC’s historically Black South Berkeley neighborhood.” Check out the mural online or drive, walk, or run by the spectacular honoring of the Black community.